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Complete undergraduate course schedule

Download or view PDFs of our Summer 2015 Undergraduate Course Schedule with Course Descriptions

Session I: May 25, 2015 – June 29, 2015

LAN160A.1  French I

Instructor: Gottlieb, M.

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

3 credits.

PHI301.1 Ethics for the Professional

Instructor: Bishop, B.

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

An examination of the most general goals, ideals, rules, and principles governing the
individual and professional within the conceptual framework of responsibility to the
client, the profession, and society. Students will be introduced to the subject matter of ethics and a variety of ethical theories. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of the professional, professional/client relationships, and issues such as confidentiality, informed consent, and deception. The course will utilize case studies from a broad variety of professions. Juniors and seniors only. 3 credits.

PSY260A.1 Traumatology

This course provides the student with a broad understanding of the psychological trauma field, including a historical and current application of theories and practice within the field. Included will be the nature of trauma (sexual abuse, combat, and natural disasters) and traumatic effects upon individuals, families, groups, communities and societies, as well as other social institutions and systems. Other areas of study will include specific focus on grief reactions and traumatic stress through exploration of the professional’s response to trauma, vicarious traumatization, disenfranchised grief, crisis intervention, comorbid disorders, and general treatment issues. Students will review case studies, in addition to critically evaluating and analyzing the latest evidence-based practice modalities within the trauma field. A variety of frameworks are to be presented and evaluated for their strengths. challenges and controversies.Satisfies psychology lower-level elective or behavioral sciences. 3 credits.

PSY360A.1 Traumatology

This course provides the student with a broad understanding of the psychological trauma field, including a historical and current application of theories and practice within the field. Included will be the nature of trauma (sexual abuse, combat, and natural disasters) and traumatic effects upon individuals, families, groups, communities and societies, as well as other social institutions and systems. Other areas of study will include specific focus on grief reactions and traumatic stress through exploration of the professional’s response to trauma, vicarious traumatization, disenfranchised grief, crisis intervention, comorbid disorders, and general treatment issues. Students will review case studies, in addition to critically evaluating and analyzing the latest evidence-based practice modalities within the trauma field. A variety of frameworks are to be presented and evaluated for their strengths. challenges and controversies. Satisfies psychology upper-level elective or behavioral sciences. 3 credits.

ACT160A.1 Dance

Instructor: Lang G.

Days: TR

Time: 11:00am-12:30pm

This introduction to dance class will explore fun, energetic styles of jazz, contemporary, and hip hop dance. Combinations include old school, floor work, and newest styles from Los Angeles and New York City, easily broken down for all to learn by a professional, award winning instructor/choreographer. All are welcome; no experience necessary. 1 credit.

FIA160B.1 History of Popular Music in America

Instructor: Newell, J.

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

This course will explore the history of popular song and its relationship with national and global events and the advancement of technology. We will begin with the Minstrel Shows of the mid-nineteenth century and trace the evolution of our nationa ‘soundtrack’ through the 20th century to the present time. Satisfies fine arts elective. 3 credits.

HIS160A.1 History of Popular Music in America

Instructor: Newell, J.

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

This course will explore the history of popular song and its relationship with national and global events and the advancement of technology. We will begin with the Minstrel Shows of the mid-nineteenth century and trace the evolution of our nationa ‘soundtrack’ through the 20th century to the present time. Satisfies history or social science elective. 3 credits.

HUS221.1 Introduction to Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services

Instructor: Hunke, B.

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

This introductory level course examines the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs as well as other addictions such as gambling, in the United States, with special attention given to local and regional problems. Topics include prevention; signs and symptoms of abuse; biological, cultural and environmental influences; effects of abuse on individual, family and other interpersonal relations, co-occurring mental health disorders, and current medical, psychosocial and peer support intervention models and techniques involved in the recovery process. Students will develop a working familiarity with ethical principles and standards which guide the behavior of individuals in the profession, as well as training, credentialing and career opportunities within the profession. Students will also be introduced to competencies and core functions which substance abuse professionals are expected to be able to perform. Field assignments will expose students to the spectrum of services which are utilized for treatment and direct knowledge of the impacts of alcohol and drugs on individuals, families and communities. Also satisfies behavioral sciences elective. 3 credits.

HUS435.1 Adolescence, Alcohol and Substance Abuse

Instructor: Walsh, R

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

The use and abuse of alcohol and other chemical substances most commonly begins in adolescence. This course will focus on the nature and scope of adolescent substance abuse, other addictions such as gambling and other mental health disorders, and related issues including: stressors associated with normal adolescent development, diagnostic considerations, legal involvement, best practice interventions, special treatment needs, and how communities can help solve the problems associated with adolescent substance abuse. Also satisfies behavioral sciences elective.3 credits.

MAT202.1 Statistics

Instructor:Keough, M.

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

Applies statistical procedure to different areas of life. Course examines descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, binomial and normal distributions, regression and correlation. 3 credits.

Session II: July 6, 2015 – August 7, 2015

ACT260A.1 Can I Have a Lasting Relationship?

Instructor: Goddard, R

Days:MW

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

What is the purpose of a long-term relationship or marriage? Why is it so difficult? How do I deal with differences in our relationship? What do I need to have a life-long relationship with the person I love? Through books, videos, and guided discussions, students will explore topics such as dating, the 5 love languages, sex, commitment, and conflict. Satisfies general elective. 3 credits.

COM201.1 Mass Media in American Culture

Instructor: Prida, J.

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

This course investigates the historical development and technological evolution of mass communication in the United States. The course will explore roles and content of newspapers, television, radio, film, and the internet from a variety of theoretical perspectives. In addition to traditional forms of media, this course will pay specific attention to emerging technologies and social networking. Satisfies communication elective and social media concentration requirement. 3 credits.

HUS315.1 Culture and Community in Human Services

Instructor: Andrade, K.

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

This course explores the historical underpinnings of service delivery as well as current day practices and service characteristics in the field of human services. The course will also address issues of ethnic-sensitive practices as well as institutional vs. community based helping services. Current legislation including the Americans with Disabilities Act will be studied. Fieldwork component will also be required. Prerequisite: PSY102 or HUS102 (required for Human Services majors), or permission of Division Chairperson. Also satisfies behavioral science elective. 3 credits.

BUS260B.1 Salesmanship and Negotiation: How to Make the Big Bucks

Instructor: Gormley, W.

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

This practical course explores the four pillars of personal selling: relationship, product, customer,and presentation strategies. Topics include the marketing concept, use of information technology, creating value, ethics, creating product solutions, value added selling, buyer behavior, prospecting and approaching prospective customers, creating a sales demonstration and presentation, negotiating buyer concerns, closing and servicing the sale, and the management of self and others. Role-playing, simulation, and case studies are used extensively. Satisfies business elective or general elective.Satisfies business elective or general elective. 3 credits.

BUS360B.1 Salesmanship and Negotiation: How to Make the Big Bucks

Instructor: Gormley, W.

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

This practical course explores the four pillars of personal selling: relationship, product, customer,and presentation strategies. Topics include the marketing concept, use of information technology, creating value, ethics, creating product solutions, value added selling, buyer behavior, prospecting and approaching prospective customers, creating a sales demonstration and presentation, negotiating buyer concerns, closing and servicing the sale, and the management of self and others. Role-playing, simulation, and case studies are used extensively. Satisfies upper-level business elective or general elective. 3 credits.

CRJ360A.1 Crime Scene Analysis

Instructor: Stahle, K.

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

This course will teach students protocol for crime scene investigations, with special reference to forensic testing techniques on evidence found at scene of crime, securing of evidence, and chain of custody. Satisfies upper-level criminal justice or general elective. 3 credits.

EDU460A.1 Crime Scene Analysis

Instructor: St. Germain, D./Highet, M.

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

This course will teach students protocol for crime scene investigations, with special reference to forensic testing techniques on evidence found at scene of crime, securing of evidence, and chain of custody. Satisfies general elective. 3 credits.

HUS305.1 Theories of Personality

Instructor: Thompson, G.

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm-9:45pm

This course will survey major counseling approaches focusing on basic concepts,
therapeutic processes, the nature of the client/therapist relationship and specific procedures applicable to individual and group situations. Professional, ethical and legal issues which impact on the counselor will be examined and special attention will be given in helping students assess their own values and communication styles as a prerequisite to counseling others through a required interpersonal skills field experience.Also satisfies behavioral science elective. 3 credits.

One-Week Courses

BUS260C.1 Military Industrial Complex (5/26-6/01)

Instructor: Fallon, G.

Days: TWRFM

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

3 credits.

SCI160A.1 Guardian Gardens (5/26-5/29 & online component)

Instructor: Huettner, M

Days:TWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

This course is based on the book of the same name by Jane Davenport, winner in the environmental book category at the prestigious Laurel Awards for the Horticultural Media Association. The book will help identify, look after, and attract our own “Garden Guardians.” Students will explore the creatures that inhabit our gardens, also known as beneficial insects and other wildlife. This is a hands-on course. We will be spending a great deal of time outside in a variety of settings, searching for and observing the insects, worms, and other critters who call our gardens home. Students will also spend time maintaining CSJ campus gardens and working on the Provider Patch. $50 lab fee. Satisfies natural sciences or general elective. 3 credits.

FIA160C.1 Fantasy Art

Instructor: Huettner, M

Days: MTWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

This mixed media workshop will allow you to unleash your creativity as you imagine a fantastical world of mermaids, fairies, dragons, and other mystical creatures, including superheroes, aliens, and robots. Each student will develop their unique concept of magical creatures residing in an appropriate habitat. Students will then create original artwork using a variety of media, including acrylic paint, watercolor, colored pencil, marker, stencil, stamp, and collage. $50 lab fee. Satisfies fine arts or general elective. 3 credits.

HUS460A.1 Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders (6/08-6/12)

Instructor: Kesler, M.

Days:MTWRF

Times: 8:00am – 5:00pm

This is an introductory survey course designed to expose students to basic information concerning the nature, suspected causes, diagnosis, and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Students will examine past and present resources, research, and issues surrounding this spectrum of disorders. Guest speakers, informational videos, case studies, and other experiential activities are included. Satisfies upper-level psychology elective, behavioral sciences, or general elective.

FIA203.1 Nature Drawing (6/22 – 6/26)

Instructor: Keefe, S

Days: MTWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

A drawing course where natural objects will be used to develop a visual awareness of the elements and principles of art. Instruction will be given in the uses of various types of media: pencil, charcoal, pastel and color pencil. FIA101 suggested before taking this course. $50 lab fee. Satisfies fine arts or general elective. 3 credits.

FIA160D.1 Experiences in Painting (7/06-7/10)

Instructor: Protivansky, C.

Days:MTWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

This course will explore the various methods of painting, including use of acrylics, watercolors, and oils. We will learn foundational painting skills in all three, as well as how to prepare to paint, proper use of supplies, and various painting surfaces. At least one project in each medium will be achieved. We will also research the masters who worked in various techniques and experience their contributions to the world of art. This course will also include visits to local art galleries that feature the works of local artists. $50 lab fee. Satisfies fine arts or general elective. 3 credits.

PSY460A.1 Bullying in Schools (7/20 – 7/24)

Instructor: Montville, C

Days: MTWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

Bullying is one of the most underreported, yet serious, problems related to safety in America’s schools today. This course is designed for guidance counselors, at-risk program coordinators, K-12 classroom teachers, special education teachers, and school administrators. Participants will explore instructional strategies for breaking the cycle of bullying including the escalating problem of Internet “cyberbullying.” Learn what to do when students use degrading language and harass others, how to promote respect, and review programs and best practices for creating safe and caring schools and involve communities. 3 credits.

Two-Week Courses

BUS260A.1 Leadership (5/26-6/08)

Instructor:Goddard, R.

Days:MTWRF

Time: 8:30am-1:00pm

A series of lectures from the Willow Creek Global Leadership Summit of the past two years. You will hear from speakers like Jim Collins, Geoffrey Canada, Chris Brown, Liz Wiseman, Mark Burnett, William Ury, and Patrick Lencioni as they speak on leadership in their field. Areas represented include traditional business, social justice, education, psychology, and the church. Students will engage in discussion about the different concepts and apply them to their lives. Satisfies business elective or general elective. 3 credits.

BUS360A.1 Leadership (5/26-6/08)

Instructor:Goddard, R.

Days:MTWRF

Time: 8:30am-1:00pm

A series of lectures from the Willow Creek Global Leadership Summit of the past two years. You will hear from speakers like Jim Collins, Geoffrey Canada, Chris Brown, Liz Wiseman, Mark Burnett, William Ury, and Patrick Lencioni as they speak on leadership in their field. Areas represented include traditional business, social justice, education, psychology, and the church. Students will engage in discussion about the different concepts and apply them to their lives. Satisfies upper-level business elective or general elective. 3 credits.

HIS206.1 History of Vermont (6/08-6/19)

Instructor: Andriscin, P.

Days:MTWRF

Time: 8:30am-1pm

Vermont is a state of mind and a state of place. This course is an examination of the
topography, history, literature, and people of Vermont from its beginnings to the present. Satisfies history elective or social science. 3 credits.

HIS360A.1 History of Vermont (6/08-6/19)

Instructor: Andriscin, P.

Days:MTWRF

Time: 8:30am-1pm

Vermont is a state of mind and a state of place. This course is an examination of the
topography, history, literature, and people of Vermont from its beginnings to the present. Satisfies upper-level history elective or upper-level social science. 3 credits.

INT160A.1 Hunger Games: The Issues of Food Insecurity (7/13-7/24)

Instructor: Lloyd, M.

Days: MTWRF

Time: 8:00am-12:30pm

What does the food we eat say about who we are? What circumstances surround issues of hunger in America? This interdisciplinary course will combine readings, films, and local class tours to study food insecurity, with particular emphasis on food systems in Vermont. Satisfies philosophy/religion elective or general elective. 3 credits.

Accelerated Courses

PSY360B.1 Psychology of Serial Murder (7/07-8/04)

Instructor: Wubbenhorst, R

Day: T

Time: 5:30pm – 9:30pm

Serial murder is perhaps one of the most frightening types of crimes imaginable. Fortunately, it is an extremely rare occurrence. Nevertheless, criminologists, sociologists, and psychologists have long been interested in the psychology of multiple murderers and how their behaviors affect the social fabric of society. This course will examine the topic of serial murder from a psychological perspective. It will examine serial murder in the past, present, and future and will provide a critical analysis of the manner in which serial murder has been depicted by the popular media. Satisfies upper-level psychology elective or general elective. 3 credits.

One Credit Courses

ACT160A.1 Dance

Instructor: Lang G.

Days: TR

Time: 11:00am-12:30pm

This introduction to dance class will explore fun, energetic styles of jazz, contemporary, and hip hop dance. Combinations include old school, floor work, and newest styles from Los Angeles and New York City, easily broken down for all to learn by a professional, award winning instructor/choreographer. All are welcome; no experience necessary. 1 credit.

Field Experiences

HUS320A.1 Field Experience I in Child and Family Services

Instructor: Walsh, R.

Days: M

Time: 4:00pm-6:00pm

The purpose of this course is to provide an introductory opportunity for supervised
application of theory to practice under direct supervision of qualified persons in a
sponsoring agency and of the college faculty. This experience provides the opportunity for a student to determine interest in a particular area through “hands on” experience in an agency. Component of 3 credits requires 120 actual hours in the field and attendance in a weekly seminar. (Supervision fee is required.) Prerequisite: Completion of core requirements, except HUS306 Case Management and Counseling and 400 level courses, a minimum of a “C” grade in PHI301 Ethics for the Professional, HUS315 Culture and Community in Human Services, and an overall cumulative average of at least “2.0” in major coursework prior to the semester in which the field experience is scheduled, or 186 permission of the instructor. $200 Field Experience Fee. Junior standing. 3 credits.

HUS320B.1 Field Experience I in Community Development and Counseling

Instructor: Walsh, R.

Days: M

Time: 4:00pm-6:00pm

The purpose of this course is to provide an introductory opportunity for supervised
application of theory to practice under direct supervision of qualified persons in a
sponsoring agency and of the college faculty. This experience provides the opportunity for a student to determine interest in a particular area through “hands on” experience in an agency. Component of 3 credits requires 120 actual hours in the field and attendance in a weekly seminar. (Supervision fee is required.) Prerequisite: Completion of core requirements, except HUS306 Case Management and Counseling and 400 level courses, a minimum of a “C” grade in PHI301 Ethics for the Professional, HUS315 Culture and Community in Human Services, and an overall cumulative average of at least “2.0” in major coursework prior to the semester in which the field experience is scheduled, or 186 permission of the instructor. $200 Field Experience Fee. Junior standing. 3 credits.

HUS420A.1 Field Experience II in Child and Family Services

Instructor: Walsh, R.

Days: M

Time: 4:00pm-6:00pm

A capstone course for Human Service majors to provide an opportunity for supervised application of theory to practice in an approved setting under direct supervision of qualified persons in the host agency and of the College faculty. This experience provides the opportunity for a student to implement his/her chosen service role while involved in a “hands on” basis within an approved services setting along with an accompanying weekly seminar. It is recommended that an agency different from the one selected for Field Experience I be chosen. The experience consists of 240 clock hours in a human services agency. Prerequisites: Completion of core requirements (except 400 level courses), a minimum of a “C” grade in PHI301 Ethics for the Professional, HUS315 Culture and Community in Human Services, and an overall cumulative average of at least “2.0” in major course work prior to the semester in which the field experience is scheduled or permission of the instructor. $200 Field Experience Fee. 6 credits.

HUS420B.1 Field Experience II in Community Development and Counseling

Instructor: Walsh, R.

Days: M

Time: 4:00pm-6:00pm

A capstone course for Human Service majors to provide an opportunity for supervised application of theory to practice in an approved setting under direct supervision of qualified persons in the host agency and of the College faculty. This experience provides the opportunity for a student to implement his/her chosen service role while involved in a “hands on” basis within an approved services setting along with an accompanying weekly seminar. It is recommended that an agency different from the one selected for Field Experience I be chosen. The experience consists of 240 clock hours in a human services agency. Prerequisites: Completion of core requirements (except 400 level courses), a minimum of a “C” grade in PHI301 Ethics for the Professional, HUS315 Culture and Community in Human Services, and an overall cumulative average of at least “2.0” in major course work prior to the semester in which the field experience is scheduled or permission of the instructor. $200 Field Experience Fee. 6 credits.

HUS420C.1 Field Experience in Alcohol/Substance Abuse Services

Instructor: Walsh, R.

Days: M

Time: 4:00pm-6:00pm

A capstone course for Human Service majors to provide an opportunity for supervised application of theory to practice in an approved setting under direct supervision of qualified persons in the host agency and of the College faculty. This experience provides the opportunity for a student to implement his/her chosen service role while involved in a “hands on” basis within an approved services setting along with an accompanying weekly seminar. It is recommended that an agency different from the one selected for Field Experience I be chosen. The experience consists of 240 clock hours in a human services agency. Prerequisites: Completion of core requirements (except 400 level courses), a minimum of a “C” grade in PHI301 Ethics for the Professional, HUS315 Culture and Community in Human Services, and an overall cumulative average of at least “2.0” in major course work prior to the semester in which the field experience is scheduled or permission of the instructor. $200 Field Experience Fee. 6 credits.

PSY320.1 Field Experience I in Psychology

Instructor: Walsh, R.

Days: M

Time: 4:00pm-6:00pm

The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for supervised application of
theory to practice in an approved psychology setting under direct supervision of qualified persons in the host agency and of the College faculty. This experience provides the opportunity for a student to implement his/her chosen service role while involved in a “hands on” basis within an approved psychology setting along with an accompanying weekly seminar. Prerequisites: Completion of core requirements (except HUS306 Case Management and Counseling and 400 level courses), a minimum of a “C” grade in PHI301 Ethics for the Professional, HUS315 Culture and Community in Human Services, and an overall cumulative average of at least “2.0” in major course work prior to the semester in which the field experience is scheduled or permission of the instructor. 3 credits.

PSY420.1 Field Experience II in Psychology

Instructor: Walsh, R.

Days: M

Time: 4:00pm-6:00pm

See PSY320 for course description. This course requires 240 clock hours working in a human services agency and integrating classroom training to working professionally in the field.
Note: It is recommended that an agency different from the one selected for Field Experience be chosen. Additional prerequisites: HUS306 Case Management and Counseling must be completed. 6 credits.