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Complete undergraduate course schedule

Download or view PDFs of our Summer 2014 Undergraduate Course Schedule with Course Descriptions

Session I: May 27, 2014 – June 30, 2014

BUS160A.1 Leadership

Instructor: Goddard, R

Days: MW

Time: 6 – 9:45 p.m.

A series of lectures from the Willow Creek Global Leadership Summit of the past two years. You will hear from such speakers as Jim Collins, Geoffrey Canada, Joseph Grenny, Chris Brown, Liz Wiseman, Mark Burnett, William Ury, and Patrick Lencioni and others as they speak on leadership in their field. Areas represented include traditional business, social justice, education, psychology, and the church. Students will engage in discussion about the different concepts and ideas presented and apply those concepts to their lives. 3 credits.

BUS260A.1 Leadership

Instructor: Goddard, R

Days: MW

Time: 6-9:45 p.m

A series of lectures from the Willow Creek Global Leadership Summit of the past two years. You will hear from such speakers as Jim Collins, Geoffrey Canada, Joseph Grenny, Chris Brown, Liz Wiseman, Mark Burnett, William Ury, and Patrick Lencioni and others as they speak on leadership in their field. Areas represented include traditional business, social justice, education, psychology, and the church. Students will engage in discussion about the different concepts and ideas presented and apply those concepts to their lives. 3 credits

BUS360A.1 Leadership

Instructor: Goddard, R

Days: MW

Time: 6-9:45 p.m

A series of lectures from the Willow Creek Global Leadership Summit of the past two years. You will hear from such speakers as Jim Collins, Geoffrey Canada, Joseph Grenny, Chris Brown, Liz Wiseman, Mark Burnett, William Ury, and Patrick Lencioni and others as they speak on leadership in their field. Areas represented include traditional business, social justice, education, psychology, and the church. Students will engage in discussion about the different concepts and ideas presented and apply those concepts to their lives. 3 credits

COM101.1 Speech Communication

Instructor: Gottlieb, M

Days: MW

Time: MW 6:00pm – 9:45pm

Study and practice of communication styles such as small group discussions, impromptu, informative, demonstration, and persuasive speeches are emphasized. Students are encouraged to develop critical thinking skills by constructive criticism of student presentations as well as constructing their own speeches. A dress code is required for formal presentations. Prerequisite: ENG101 with a grade of “C’ or better. 3 credits.

ENG260A.1 Religion in Literature

Instructor: Bishop, B

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

This course will explore religious themes such as redemption, incarnation, love, peace, judgment, and tranquility through literature using fables, parables, and short stories from Eastern and Western traditions. Prerequisite: ENG102. 3 credits.

ENG360A.1 Religion in Literature

Instructor: Bishop, B

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

This course will explore religious themes such as redemption, incarnation, love, peace, judgment, and tranquility through literature using fables, parables, and short stories from Eastern and Western traditions. Prerequisite: ENG102. 3 credits.

HUS221.1 Introduction to Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services

Instructor: Walsh, R

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

This introductory level course examines the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs as well as other addictions such as gambling, in the United States, with special attention given to local and regional problems. Topics include prevention; signs and symptoms of abuse; biological, cultural and environmental influences; effects of abuse on individual, family and other interpersonal relations, co-occurring mental health disorders, and current medical, psychosocial and peer support intervention models and techniques involved in the recovery process. Students will develop a working familiarity with ethical principles and standards which guide the behavior of individuals in the profession, as well as training, credentialing and career opportunities within the profession. Students will also be introduced to competencies and core functions which substance abuse professionals are expected to be able to perform. Field assignments will expose students to the spectrum of services which are utilized for treatment and direct knowledge of the impacts of alcohol and drugs on individuals, families and communities. 3 credits.

HUS401.1 Ethics and Foundation of Alcohol & Substance Abuse Counseling

Instructor: Walsh, R

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

This course examines ethical, legal and foundational issues that confront practitioners in substance abuse counseling. Students will develop substantial knowledge of the substance abuse counselor core functions and national competency standards. Ethical standards for best practice will be explored in detail including the 12 specific principles of: non-discrimination, responsibility, competence, legal and moral standards, public statements, publication credit, client welfare, confidentiality, client relationships, collegial relationships, remuneration and societal obligations, and students will learn and practice utilizing a values-based ethical decision making process to address ethical dilemmas. Professional training and credentialing requirements as well as various career opportunities in Vermont and surrounding states will be reviewed. Professional issues such as disclosure and privacy regulations, liability and risk management practices, insurance impact of culture, legal issues, and health maintenance practices will be reviewed. An overview of the spectrum of addictive disorders and co-occurring disorders as well as treatment options will be reviewed. 3 credits.

MAT202.1 Statistics

Instructor:Rocque-Tifft, J

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

Applies statistical procedure to different areas of life. Course examines descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, binomial and normal distributions, regression and correlation. Sophomore Standing. 3 credits.

PHI301.1 Ethics for the Professional

Instructor: Bishop, B

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

An examination of the most general goals, ideals, rules, and principles governing the individual and professional within the conceptual framework of responsibility to the client, the profession, and society. Students will be introduced to the subject matter of ethics and a variety of ethical theories. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of the professional, professional/client relationships, and issues such as confidentiality, informed consent, and deception. The course will utilize case studies from a broad variety of professions. Junior standing required. 3 credits.

PSY102.1 Introduction to Psychology

Instructor: Andrade, K

Days: TR

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

This course provides an overview of the major areas of psychological study including biology and behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, intelligence, language, motivation, emotion, abnormal psychology, and therapy. Historical and current theoretical approaches to understanding human behavior will be reviewed and the student will be introduced to scientific methods of inquiry in psychology. This is a basic course intended for both psychology majors and others interested in the field of psychology. 3 credits.

REL260A.1 Religion in Literature

Instructor: Bishop, B
Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

This course will explore religious themes such as redemption, incarnation, love, peace, judgment, and tranquility through literature using fables, parables, and short stories from Eastern and Western traditions. Prerequisite: ENG102. 3 credits.

Session II: July 7, 2014 – August 8, 2014

BUS330.1 Investments

Instructor: Goddard, R

Days:TR

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

Provides a framework for understanding equity and debt investment alternatives; risk-return analysis, market efficiency, and portfolio theory. Prerequisites: BUS301 or permission of Division Chair and junior standing. 3 credits

ENG101.1 Introduction to College Writing

Instructor: Highet, M

Days: TR

Time: 8:00am – 2:00pm

This course develops interdisciplinary skills in effective writing to prepare students for their major. Students will be required to write papers using a variety of rhetorical devices such as narration, description, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, argumentation, classification and process analysis culminating in at least one research paper. Frequent written assignments and acquisition of vocabulary are emphasized. Additionally, students will learn and demonstrate appropriate information literacy skills such as discipline specific research, database navigation, online literacy and effective electronic communication. A grade of “C” or higher is required for admission into ENG102. 4 credits.

ENG160A.1 Introduction to Mythology

Instructor: Brown, R

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

The stories and legends that we today collectively call “myth” were in fact the religious belief systems of ancient cultures. Tales of creation, destruction, gods and heroes were developed as a means of explaining mysterious and sometimes frightening natural phenomena. Most ancient religions have passed into history; but a few, such as Hinduism, remain in practice today. The ancient Hebrew creation story in the biblical book of Genesis is known to billions worldwide, and remnants of other systems can be found in art and popular culture. This course will explore several of these belief systems, including those of China, Egypt, Greece, India, Mesopotamia, and Scandinavia, looking at how they met the needs of their respective societies. We will also discuss the many commonalities that ideationally link the beliefs of diverse cultures, and consider the remarkable phenomenon of unrelated societies around the globe independently developing virtually identical mythologies. Satisfies global awareness. 3 credits.

ENG260B.1 Introduction to Mythology

Instructor: Brown, R

Days: MW

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

The stories and legends that we today collectively call “myth” were in fact the religious belief systems of ancient cultures. Tales of creation, destruction, gods and heroes were developed as a means of explaining mysterious and sometimes frightening natural phenomena. Most ancient religions have passed into history; but a few, such as Hinduism, remain in practice today. The ancient Hebrew creation story in the biblical book of Genesis is known to billions worldwide, and remnants of other systems can be found in art and popular culture. This course will explore several of these belief systems, including those of China, Egypt, Greece, India, Mesopotamia, and Scandinavia, looking at how they met the needs of their respective societies. We will also discuss the many commonalities that ideationally link the beliefs of diverse cultures, and consider the remarkable phenomenon of unrelated societies around the globe independently developing virtually identical mythologies. Satisfies global awareness. 3 credits.

HUS435.1 Adolescence, Alcohol & Substance Abuse

Instructor: Walsh, R

Days:TR

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

The use and abuse of alcohol and other chemical substances most commonly begins in adolescence. This course will focus on the nature and scope of adolescent substance abuse, other addictions such as gambling and other mental health disorders, and related issues including: stressors associated with normal adolescent development, diagnostic considerations, legal involvement, best practice interventions, special treatment needs, and how communities can help solve the problems associated with adolescent substance abuse. 3 credits.

PSY103.1 Developmental Psychology

Instructor: Reed, M

Days: TR

Time:6:00pm – 9:45pm

A systematic examination of the processes of human development from birth to death. Emotional, intellectual, social, biological and other psychological aspects of growth will be considered from the perspectives of stage theorists such as Freud, Piaget, and Erickson as well as from perspectives derived from classical and operant conditioning work of Pavlov, Skinner, and social learning theorists. Prerequisites: PSY102. 3 credits.

PSY460A.1 Positive Psychology

Instructor: Thompson, G

Days:TR

Time: 6:00pm – 9:45pm

This course is an overview of the scientific study of human strengths. Topics include resilience, optimism, vital engagement (flow), positive relationships, creativity, wisdom, happiness, empathy, emotional intelligence, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the psychological factors relevant to enhancing well-being. 3 credits.

One-Week Courses

BUS160A.1 Birds, Bees, Butterflies: The Fundamentals of Sustainable Gardening (5/27- 5/30)

Instructor: Huettner, M

Days:TWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

The primary objective of this course is to enhance the CSJ campus through the establishment of perennial gardens. Students will explore the study of botany, including plant propagation pollination, hybridization, and soil health and amendment. Students will research a variety of plant species, including height, spread and bloom time.

They will also research a variety of garden designs, including the Japanese Meditation Gardens and English, French, and Italian design styles. The students will then plan and implement a garden. This is a hands-on course, accordingly students should come prepared to travel to local gardening shops and work outside – soil amendment and planting will be part of the course expectations. In addition, there will be an online research assignment, which will be due on May 27. 3 credits.

SCI160A.1 Birds, Bees, Butterflies: The Fundamentals of Sustainable Gardening (5/27- 5/30)

Instructor: Huettner, M

Days:TWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

The primary objective of this course is to enhance the CSJ campus through the establishment of perennial gardens. Students will explore the study of botany, including plant propagation pollination, hybridization, and soil health and amendment. Students will research a variety of plant species, including height, spread and bloom time.

They will also research a variety of garden designs, including the Japanese Meditation Gardens and English, French, and Italian design styles. The students will then plan and implement a garden. This is a hands-on course, accordingly students should come prepared to travel to local gardening shops and work outside – soil amendment and planting will be part of the course expectations. In addition, there will be an online research assignment, which will be due on May 27. 3 credits.

FIA160A.1 Decorative Painting (6/02 – 6/06)

Instructor: Huettner, M

Days:MTWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

This course will encompass a progression of decorative painting techniques. Students will begin with surface preparation and backgrounds, including basic faux finishing. We will explore the use of variety of brushes and brushstrokes, progressing through common painting techniques, including floating and blending. Students will complete a variety of designs on selected surfaces. $50 lab fee. 3 credits

BUS160B.1 Becoming a Localvore (6/09 – 6/13)

Instructor:Huettner, M

Days:MTWRF

Times: 8:00am – 5:00pm

What is a Localvore? A Localvore is a person dedicated to eating food grown and produced locally. There are lots of good reasons to eat locally grown and produced food. This course will explore the current trend to be a “Localvore.” We will compare/contrast the health benefits and costs of the Localvore food supply structure. This is a hands-on course and accordingly, students will travel together to a variety of organizations to observe first-hand the challenges and rewards of these businesses. $50 lab fee. 3 credits.

SCI160B.1 Becoming a Localvore (6/09 – 6/13)

Instructor:Huettner, M

Days:MTWRF

Times: 8:00am – 5:00pm

What is a Localvore? A Localvore is a person dedicated to eating food grown and produced locally. There are lots of good reasons to eat locally grown and produced food. This course will explore the current trend to be a “Localvore.” We will compare/contrast the health benefits and costs of the Localvore food supply structure. This is a hands-on course and accordingly, students will travel together to a variety of organizations to observe first-hand the challenges and rewards of these businesses. $50 lab fee. 3 credits.

FIA203.1 Nature Drawing (6/23 – 6/27)

Instructor: Keefe, S

Days: MTWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

A drawing course where natural objects will be used to develop a visual awareness of the elements and principles of art. Instruction will be given in the uses of various types of media: pencil, charcoal, pastel and color pencil. FIA101 suggested before taking this course. $50 lab fee. 3 credits.

PHI160A.1 Contemporary Moral Problems Through Film (7/07 – 7/11)

Instructor: Lukaskiewicz, R

Days:MTWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

An examination of moral problems through the use of selected modern film. Medical, legal, business, and environmental ethics are among the topics that will be explored. Theological and philosophical thought will be utilized to better understand reasoned responses to such moral problems. 3 credits.

FIA207.1 Painting I (7/21 – 7/25)

Instructor:Protivansky, C

Days:MTWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

Basic techniques in brush work, using and mixing colors, composition and design will be explored. Landscape and still life studies will be used. Knowledge of drawing useful, but not required. FIA101 suggested before taking this course. $50 lab fee. 3 credits.

PSY460B.1 Bullying in Schools (7/21 – 7/25)

Instructor: Montville, C

Days: MTWRF

Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm

Bullying is one of the most underreported, yet serious, problems related to safety in America’s schools today. This course is designed for guidance counselors, at-risk program coordinators, K-12 classroom teachers, special education teachers, and school administrators. Participants will explore instructional strategies for breaking the cycle of bullying including the escalating problem of Internet “cyberbullying.” Learn what to do when students use degrading language and harass others, hot to promote respect, and review programs and best practices for creating safe and caring schools and involve communities. 3 credit.

Two-Week Courses

CRJ260A.1 Detective Fiction (5/27 – 6/09)

Instructor:Chalidze/Highet

Days:MTWRF

Time: 10:00am – 12:00pm

Whodunit? If these words immediately pique your interests, this may be the course for you. Students will examine detective fiction as a vehicle for historical, social, political, intellectual, and cultural issues. The course will explore espionage & detective fiction with specific attention given to legal aspects in one of the most popular and widely read literary forms in the world. Some films will be included. Required reading: “The Maltese Falcon” by Hammet, “Innocent Monster” by Coleman, “Above Suspicion” by MacInnes, and “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” by Larrson. Satisfies Criminal Justice elective or social science elective. 3 credits.

ENG260C.1 Detective Fiction (5/27 – 6/09)

Instructor: Chalidze/Highet

Days:MTWRF

Time: 10:00am – 12:00pm

Whodunit? If these words immediately pique your interests, this may be the course for you. Students will examine detective fiction as a vehicle for historical, social, political, intellectual, and cultural issues. The course will explore espionage & detective fiction with specific attention given to legal aspects in one of the most popular and widely read literary forms in the world. Some films will be included. Required reading: “The Maltese Falcon” by Hammet, “Innocent Monster” by Coleman, “Above Suspicion” by MacInnes, and “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” by Larrson. Satisfies Criminal Justice elective or social science elective. 3 credits.

HIS160A.1 American Revolution (5/27 – 6/09)

Instructor: Andriscin, P

Days: MTWRF

Time: 8:30am – 1:00pm

Although this course will cover the entire revolution from the causes to the creation of a U.S. Constitution, the course will explore the actions both military and political of the Northern Campaign of the American Revolution utilizing the historic sites in the area. The course’s focus will be on the 1775 – ’76 attempt to capture Quebec and the subsequent retreat, the creation and fortification of the American defenses. This will be followed by the attempts of Great Britain to defeat the American forces the following year, divide the colonies and end the rebellion. 3 credits.

HIS360A.1 American Revolution (5/27 – 6/09)

Instructor: Andriscin, P

Days:MTWRF

Time: 8:30am – 1:00pm

Although this course will cover the entire revolution from the causes to the creation of a U.S. Constitution, the course will explore the actions both military and political of the Northern Campaign of the American Revolution utilizing the historic sites in the area. The course’s focus will be on the 1775 – ’76 attempt to capture Quebec and the subsequent retreat, the creation and fortification of the American defenses. This will be followed by the attempts of Great Britain to defeat the American forces the following year, divide the colonies and end the rebellion. 3 credits.

BUS160D.1 Biblical Leadership (6/02 – 6/13)

Instructor:Goddard, R

Days: MTWRF

Time: 1:00pm – 5:30pm

Students will go through several books of the Bible to look at Leadership from a Godly perspective. How does God want us to lead? What are the elements of Biblical Leadership? Who were the great leaders of the Bible and what made them great leaders? Books from the Bible will include: Nehemia, Exodus, Esther, Kings, as well as Acts, Timothy, and Peter. 3 credits.

BUS260B.1 Biblical Leadership (6/02 – 6/13)

Instructor:Goddard, R

Days: MTWRF

Time: 1:00pm – 5:30pm

Students will go through several books of the Bible to look at Leadership from a Godly perspective. How does God want us to lead? What are the elements of Biblical Leadership? Who were the great leaders of the Bible and what made them great leaders? Books from the Bible will include: Nehemia, Exodus, Esther, Kings, as well as Acts, Timothy, and Peter. 3 credits.

BUS360B.1 Biblical Leadership (6/02 – 6/13)

Instructor:Goddard, R

Days: MTWRF

Time: 1:00pm – 5:30pm

Students will go through several books of the Bible to look at Leadership from a Godly perspective. How does God want us to lead? What are the elements of Biblical Leadership? Who were the great leaders of the Bible and what made them great leaders? Books from the Bible will include: Nehemia, Exodus, Esther, Kings, as well as Acts, Timothy, and Peter. 3 credits.

REL260A.1 Biblical Leadership (6/02 – 6/13)

Instructor:Goddard, R

Days: MTWRF

Time: 1:00pm – 5:30pm

Students will go through several books of the Bible to look at Leadership from a Godly perspective. How does God want us to lead? What are the elements of Biblical Leadership? Who were the great leaders of the Bible and what made them great leaders? Books from the Bible will include: Nehemia, Exodus, Esther, Kings, as well as Acts, Timothy, and Peter. 3 credits.

REL360A.1 Biblical Leadership (6/02 – 6/13)

Instructor:Goddard, R

Days: MTWRF

Time: 1:00pm – 5:30pm

Students will go through several books of the Bible to look at Leadership from a Godly perspective. How does God want us to lead? What are the elements of Biblical Leadership? Who were the great leaders of the Bible and what made them great leaders? Books from the Bible will include: Nehemia, Exodus, Esther, Kings, as well as Acts, Timothy, and Peter. 3 credits.

PHI160B.1 Philosophy Through The Matrix (6/09 – 6/20)

Instructor: Weber, D

Days: MTWRF

Time: 10:00am – 2:00pm

This course provides a window into the world of contemporary philosophy, with significant reference to and review of key ideas from pre-modern thinkers, including Plato, Descartes, Berkeley and others. Using the trilogy of Matrix films as its unifying theme, the course is based on a 2005 anthology of contemporary philosophers, including well-known established thinkers such as David Chalmers and work by rising younger scholars including several women. Class sessions will include close reading and discussion of the fifteen approximately twenty page essays and viewing selected scenes from the films referenced in the essays. Though the course centers on ethical, metaphysical and epistemological problems (especially Artificial Intelligence) arising from the film trilogy, this is not primarily a cinema course. Instead, it provides an alternative to a traditional Introduction to Philosophy course by looking at some of what philosophers today are actually thinking and writing about. 3 credits.

Accelerated Courses

HUS260A.1 Women’s & Men’s Issues (5/28, 6/04, 6/11, 6/18, 6/25)

Instructor: Chamberlain, M

Day:W

Time: 5:30pm – 9:30pm

In this course, we will explore what it means to be a woman, a man, or someone in between or outside of these possibilities. We will consider gender from a variety of vantage points, including those of biology, culture and politics, race, psychoanalysis, psychopathology, religion, philosophy, and mythology. Goals for the course include abundant dialogue about the diversity of our gendered world, media portrayal of gender norms, differences and comparisons in leadership styles and the further development of our individual perspectives and improvement in understanding through valuable communication on issues as a gendered person. 3 credits.

HUS360A.1 Women’s & Men’s Issues (5/28, 6/04, 6/11, 6/18, 6/25)

Instructor: Chamberlain, M

Day:W

Time: 5:30pm – 9:30pm

In this course, we will explore what it means to be a woman, a man, or someone in between or outside of these possibilities. We will consider gender from a variety of vantage points, including those of biology, culture and politics, race, psychoanalysis, psychopathology, religion, philosophy, and mythology. Goals for the course include abundant dialogue about the diversity of our gendered world, media portrayal of gender norms, differences and comparisons in leadership styles and the further development of our individual perspectives and improvement in understanding through valuable communication on issues as a gendered person. 3 credits.

PSY350.1 Educational Psychology (6/02, 6/09, 6/16, 6/23, 6/30)

Instructor: Kesler, M

Day: M

Time: 5:30pm – 9:30pm

This course examines theories and principles of learning as they relate to human development through childhood, adolescence and into the adult years. Emphasis will be placed on examining ways to produce optimal conditions for learning to occur, and the evaluation of teaching strategies and procedures that are utilized in educational settings. Prerequisite: PSY102. 3 credits.

HUS260B.1 Wellness & Well-Being (7/07, 7/14, 7/21, 7/28, 8/04)

Instructor: Reed, M

Day: M

Time: 5:30pm – 9:30pm

This course will explore concepts of wellness, enabling the student to assess personal characteristics and lifestyle patterns with a view toward developing and maintaining an enhanced quality of life. Investigation into the various components of wellness (intellectual, physical, social, environmental, and spiritual) will enable the learner to acquire knowledge and skills that can be applied to their personal life, as well as the process of helping others through counseling and teaching. Behavior change plans will be developed as part of the learning experience. 3 credits.

HUS360B.1 Wellness & Well-Being (7/07, 7/14, 7/21, 7/28, 8/04)

Instructor: Reed, M

Day:M

Time: 5:30pm – 9:30pm

This course will explore concepts of wellness, enabling the student to assess personal characteristics and lifestyle patterns with a view toward developing and maintaining an enhanced quality of life. Investigation into the various components of wellness (intellectual, physical, social, environmental, and spiritual) will enable the learner to acquire knowledge and skills that can be applied to their personal life, as well as the process of helping others through counseling and teaching. Behavior change plans will be developed as part of the learning experience. 3 credits.

PSY360A.1 Psychology of Serial Murder (7/08, 7/15, 7/22, 7/29, 8/05)

Instructor: Wubbenhorst, R

Day: T

Time: 5:30pm – 9:30pm

Serial murder is perhaps one of the most frightening types of crimes imaginable. Fortunately, it is an extremely rare occurrence. Nevertheless, criminologists, sociologists, and psychologists have long been interested in the psychology of multiple murderers and how their behaviors affect the social fabric of society. This course will examine the topic of serial murder from a psychological perspective. It will examine serial murder in the past, present, and future and will provide a critical analysis of the manner in which serial murder has been depicted by the popular media. 3 credits.

HUS306.1 Case Management & Counseling (7/09, 7/16, 7/23, 7/30, 8/06)

Instructor: Frankel-Boerner, L

Day: W

Time: 5:30pm – 9:30pm

Students are instructed in the skills of assessing a client’s unique treatment or program needs, designing a treatment or service plan, delivering a course of counseling, documenting and evaluating progress, and working within a team approach in order to ensure that appropriate services are provided to clients. As part of the course, students will focus on refining their skills to develop and maintain effective relationships with clients, and practice specific counseling strategies and techniques in the context of simulated individual and group counseling situations. Prerequisite: 12 hours in HUS or PSY including PSY103 and 304. HUS305 is also recommended. 3 credits.