Arts & Sciences Division

Activities

ACT111.1 First Year Experience Part I

1 credit. W, 9:00am – 9:50am

Through a variety of activities, students will be introduced to college resources and opportunities in the College community. Class activities will be directed toward helping students take responsibility for their own learning, career exploration, and becoming engaged in college activities and activities of civic engagement. Course topics will include goal setting, academic advisement, study skills, note taking, time management and research. All transfer students with at least 24 credits and in good standing, and students who are 22 years or older are exempt from taking the course. Freshmen course.

ACT160A.1 Dance

1 credit. W, 4:30pm-5:20 pm

This awesome intro to dance class will explore fun, energetic styles of Jazz, Contemporary and Hip Hop dance. Combinations include old school, floor work and the newest styles from LA & NYC, easily broken down for all to learn by a professional, award winning Instructor/Choreographer. All are welcome, no experience necessary.

ACT160B.1 Chorus

1 credit. T, 4:00pm – 5:20pm

This course is a mixed ensemble of medium to large size that performs quality literature from the choral repertoire. Participation in an evening Ensemble Concert performance to be scheduled during the last week of semester classes will be in lieu of the final exam for full course credit. 1 or 2 credits.

ACT160C.1 Chorus

1 credit. TR, 4:00pm – 5:20pm

This course is a mixed ensemble of medium to large size that performs quality literature from the choral repertoire. Participation in an evening Ensemble Concert performance to be scheduled during the last week of semester classes will be in lieu of the final exam for full course credit. 1 or 2 credits.

ACT401.1 Career Workshop II

1 credit. T, 11:00am – 11:50am

Emphasis is placed on linking career selection to a resume specifically designed to present appropriate core competencies, application of the CAR model to define and present applicable quantitative accomplishments in narrative form along with outlining employment history, education, certifications and awards. Students will create a QR based resume card and construct their Internet resume site page to include a digital portfolio. In concert with resume preparation are lessons in composing result producing, attention-getting letters of introduction and inquiry. Central to the workshop is preparing the student for the all important job interview. This is accomplished through a series of intense job interview role plays emphasizing behavioral based interview questions and skill development. Students participating in this workshop should already have made significant progress toward formulating a career objective. The workshop concludes with a consideration towards long-term planning for career growth and change.

Biology

BIO101.1 Biology I

4 credits. MF, 9:30am-10:50 am. M (lab), 6pm-8:50pm

This is an introductory Biology course covering basic biological concepts including scientific method, evolution, the diversity of life, plants and ecology. This course is suitable for health science and radiography majors and counts toward the natural science component of the College Core Curriculum. Lab coat required. $125 lab fee.

BIO201.1 Medical Terminology

1 credit. Online.

Medical terminology is the specialized language of health care practitioners. In this course, students will be immersed in word roots, prefixes, suffixes, eponyms and abbreviations used in medical language. Students will be expected to discern meanings and pronunciations of medical terms in general, and for medical language specific to body regions, organs and organ systems, tissues, medical diagnoses and procedures and diseases and disease treatment.

BIO231.1 Anatomy & Physiology I

4 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am. R (lab), 1:00pm-3:50pm

This course is designed as an introduction to anatomy and physiology of the human body. This course will cover chemical, cellular, tissue, organ and organ systems levels of organization. Homeostasis, the central, unifying concept of human physiology, is applied to the integument and to the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. The anatomy and physiology of the integument and the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems will be examined, as will the special senses. Lab coat required. $125 lab fee.

BIO241.1 Genetics

3 credits. TR, 11:00am-12:20pm. MF (lab), 2:30pm-3:50pm

Genetics is a branch of biological science that affects every other biological discipline. Understanding the role that genetics plays in life is essential for any student of biology. This introductory course, required of all Health Science majors, will allow students to obtain the knowledge required to understand the role of genetics in all levels of life, from molecules to ecosystems. Topics discussed in this course will include, but are not limited to, genes, chromosomes, linkage, inheritance, DNA structure and analysis, DNA recombination and replication, translation, mutation, gene expression, genomics, proteomics, cancer, genetic engineering, developmental genetics, quantitative genetics, population and evolutionary genetics, conservation genetics, epigenetics, DNA forensics, genomics and personalized medicine and stem cells.

BIO412.1 Immunology

3 credits. MF, 1:00pm-2:20pm

This course is focused on the immune system, an integrated network of cells, molecules and organs. The immune system will be studied both in big picture concepts and in cellular and molecular details. The sequence of topics covered will reflect the sequence of events that occurs normally during typical immune responses. Specific topics covered will include cells, organs and environments of the immune system; receptors and signaling; innate immunity; the complement system; expression of lymphocyte receptor genes; the major histocompatibility complex and antigen presentation; T-cell and B-cell development, activation, differentiation and memory; cell- and antibody-mediated immunity; the immune response; allergy, hypersensitivities, and chronic inflammation; tolerance, autoimmunity and transplantation; infectious diseases and vaccines; immunodeficiency disorders; cancer and immunity; and experimental systems and methods. Prerequisite: BIO102, BIO241, BIO251.

Chemistry

CHE101.1 General Chemistry I

4 credits. TR, 1:00pm-2:20pm. TR (lab), 8:00am-9:20am

This is the first of a two-part course on the principles of chemistry. Specifically, the principles of matter, atoms, elements, molecules, compounds, chemical equations, laws of mass action, aqueous reactions, gases, thermochemistry, atomic quantum mechanics, periodic properties of elements and chemical bonding theories will be discussed. A major focus of the course is problem-solving skills. Also, science as a way of knowing is emphasized. This course is suitable for health science majors and counts toward the natural science component of the College Core Curriculum. Lab coat required. $125 lab fee.

Communications

COM101.1 Speech Communication

3 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am

Study and practice of communication styles such as small group discussions, impromptu, informative, demonstration, and persuasive speeches are emphasized. Students are encouraged to develop critical thinking skills by constructive criticism of student presentations as well as constructing their own speeches. A dress code is required for formal presentations.

COM260A.1 Writing for the Web

3 credits. R, 4:00pm-6:30pm

This course is designed to provide students with solid introductory knowledge of content creation and curation techniques for the Web, identifying the needs of an audience and the importance of style and grammar standards. Students will learn and execute various forms of writing, including blogging, journalistic writing, broadcast writing and distribution of content via social media. In addition, the course will cover broader topics including legal and ethical issues, such as libel and copyrights, and a look at the changes technology has brought, such as the shift in the influence of traditional media outlets.

Developmental Studies

DEV104.1 Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 credits. MTF, 11:00am-11:50am

This course is designed for students who lack basic arithmetic and algebraic skills. It is required for students whose high school grades, SAT scores, or placement testing indicate deficiencies in fundamental processes and procedures. A grade of ―C‖ or higher is required for admission to all math courses. Students obtaining a grade of “C-” or below may repeat the course only once. In such an instance, the course must be repeated in the next semester it is offered, and the student must earn a grade of “C’ or higher in order to continue at the College.

English

ENG102.1 Reading & Writing About Literature

3 credits. MF, 9:30am-10:50am

This course is designed to help students develop their writing skills to become more understanding and appreciative readers of literature through a close examination of stories, poems, and plays. Students will write analytical and interpretive essays and acquire a vocabulary of literary terms.

ENG103.1 College Composition I: Engaged Citizens

3 credits. MF, 8:00am-9:20am

The course examines what it means to be an engaged citizen in century America. By exploring foundation documents such as the Declaration of Independence and early 162 Greek democracies, along with modern interpretations of participatory citizenship, this class asks students to question what makes a person an engaged citizen. Students will write frequently in the course, culminating in a research paper. Students will also give multiple in-class presentations and work collaboratively. Course must be completed with a grade of ―C or higher.

ENG211.1 American Literature

3 credits. MF, 2:30pm – 3:50pm

This course is a survey of the major authors, genres and themes of American literature from the colonial period to the twenty-first century. Prerequisite: ENG102 or ENG104.

ENG260A.1/ENG360A.1 Page 394: A Critical Examination of the Wizarding World of Harry Potter

3 credits. Online.

This course will examine the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. The course will discuss the entire series, its sources and forerunners, the various types of literature it embodies, as well as the ethical implications the series has for contemporary culture. Students will be expected to read the seven part book series; the course will also include discussions of the films.

Fine Arts

FIA104.1 The Art of Drawing

3 credits TR, 11:00am – 12:20pm

Fundamentals of drawing and composition including still life and landscape with emphasis on pencil, charcoal, conte crayon and pen and ink, etc. The course will develop a visual awareness of shape, line, color, value, texture and space. (May be repeated based on individual evaluation.) $50 lab fee.

FIA111.1 Applied Design

3 credits. T, 4:00pm – 6:30pm

This course will focus on two-dimensional applications of elements and principles of design in fine art, commercial design, and environmental aesthetics. $50 lab fee.

FIA160A.1 Sculpture Techniques

3 credits. MF, 11:00am-12:20pm

Explore your interest in detail as you create human heads and faces, animals, flowers, or whatever creative interest you have through sculpture. We will focus primarily on polymer clay which is easy to work with allowing even the beginner to experience success. We will also create sculpture using wire and instant paper mache. Some time will be spent experimenting using clay. Learning about what sculpture is, as well as researching past and current sculptors, will add meaning to this technique as well as stimulate students to be creative. Individual interests and creativity will be encouraged. $50 lab fee.

FIA160C.1 World of Music

3 credits. MF, 11:00am – 12:20pm

This course seeks to explore the role of music in society through the many genres that co-exist in the age of global communications. Discussion will lead us through the careers related to the production and consumption of music, demographics of consumers, and economic and social impact.

FIA160D.1 Discovery in Clay

3 credits. MF, 9:30am-10:50am

Indulge your more creative side by semi-independently discovering the basics, plus sculpture, in clay. Students will learn the basic techniques of constructing in clay but through their own project interpretation. Each student will independently choose project to be made in each method, with the approval of the instructor. Through student generated goals each project will be constructed and created to meet the standards of the course. This is a great opportunity to create and challenge yourself according to your own level of interest and ability. $50 lab fee.

FIA160F.1 Stone and Wood Sculpture

3 credits. F, 1:00pm – 5:00pm

Carving is one of our oldest sculptural traditions. This course will introduce students to basic carving techniques for stone and wood, such as cutting, shaping, and polishing. Both direct and indirect approaches to creating three dimensional work will be explored to distinguish between process and approach and how these affect the final results. Students will maintain a sketchbook. This sketchbook will be used to annotate ideas, themes, and conceptual discourse. For the planning and the physical process of moving from idea to drawing to three dimensional objects. To be held at the Carving Studio & Sculpture Center in West Rutland. Transportation will not be provided.

History

HIS101.1 World Civilizations I

3 credits. MF, 11:00am – 12:20pm

This course examines varied aspects of world history from the beginnings of civilization to approximately A.D. 1500.

HIS103.1 United States History I

3 credits. TR, 1:00pm – 2:20pm

This course presents a survey of the history of the United States from the Colonial period through the Civil War. Students will be introduced to the major social, political, cultural and economic developments that occurred within the U.S. during this period.

HIS260A.1 Women’s History I

3 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am

This course is a multicultural history which examines the social, political, economic and cultural experiences of American women from the colonial period through 1877. Women’s roles in conjunction with major historical events and the multiple life-ways of American women from varying economic classes, regions, races and ethnic backgrounds will be studied.

HIS260B.1/HIS360.B1 American Protest Movements

3 credits. TR, 8:00am-9:20am

The course explores significant protest movements in America with a focus on leadership, protest thought, and public acceptance of dissent ideology. The course examines these movements from a social history perspective, but will include the political, economic, and cultural contexts in which these protests evolved. The course also draws on the convergence of race, class, and gender within these movements and what these historical themes mean for social change movements today

HIS260C.1/HIS360C.1 Hollywood History

3 credits. T, 6:45pm-9:15pm

This course will explore film productions of historical subjects, focusing on their treatment of historical events, biases, objectivity, factuality, as well as their quality and Importance to the field of history.

Interdisciplinary Studies

INT201.1 Conflict, Cooperation and Community

3 credits. MF, 1:00pm-2:20pm

This course provides students with frameworks to engage in healthy conflict resolution, as well as the tools to promote interpersonal cooperation. Students will engage in cross-cultural community building, research various strategies for the promotion of cooperation and present findings to their peers. Additionally, the course will require students to demonstrate what they have learned in class in a variety of out-of-classroom experiences.

Learning Resources Development

LRS101.1 Reading and Study Skills

2 credits. MF, 1:00pm-2:20pm

This course is designed to develop and improve the students’ skills in the following areas: Learning and Study Skills, Reading Comprehension, and Organizing and Developing Ideas. Students will practice listening memory, time management, and note-taking skills, develop an understanding of learning styles, and learn test-taking and study strategies.

Mathematics

MAT101.1 Survey of Mathematics

3 credits. TR, 9:30am – 10:50am

A broad overview of significant mathematical concepts. The course provides a concentrated introduction to selected topics. Concepts that will be covered include set operations, number systems, consumer mathematics as well as basic algebra, geometry, probability and statistics.

MAT101.2 Survey of Mathematics

3 credits. MW, 5:00pm-6:20pm

A broad overview of significant mathematical concepts. The course provides a concentrated introduction to selected topics. Concepts that will be covered include set operations, number systems, consumer mathematics as well as basic algebra, geometry, probability and statistics.

MAT105.1 Pre-Calculus

3 credits. TR, 8:00am-9:20am

This course blends the concepts and skills that must be mastered before enrollment in a college-level calculus course. The course includes the study of relations and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry in triangles, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations.

MAT202.1 Statistics

3 credits. MF, 8:00am – 9:20am

Applies statistical procedure to different areas of life. Course examines descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, binomial and normal distributions, regression and correlation.

MAT202.2 Statistics

3 credits. M, 6:45pm – 9:15pm

Applies statistical procedure to different areas of life. Course examines descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, binomial and normal distributions, regression and correlation.

Philosophy

PHI260A.1 Inconceivable: The Philosophies of Life

3 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am

Based on the book, The Princess Bride by William Goldman, this course will examine the philosophical backgrounds of love, lies, promises made, pain, winning and losing, doubt, revenge, punishment, evil, miracles and true love using essays written on each subject and reflected in the book and movie made based on the book.

PHI301.1 Ethics for the Professional

3 credits. TR, 8:00am – 9:20am

An examination of the most general goals, ideals, rules, and principles governing the individual and professional within the conceptual framework of responsibility to the client, the profession, and society. Students will be introduced to the subject matter of ethics and a variety of ethical theories. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of the professional, professional/client relationships, and issues such as confidentiality, informed consent, and deception. The course will utilize case studies from a broad variety of professions.

Political Science

POS102.1 American Government

3 credits. TR, 2:30pm-3:50pm

This course surveys the structure and functions of the U.S. political system, the historical context of that system, and the major issues and problems confronting that system in the current century.

Physical Education

PHE110.1 Bowling

1 credit. F, 1:00pm-2:20pm

This course will enable students to learn and practice the fundamentals of bowling. $75 lab fee.

PHE160D.1 Fitness for Life

1 credit. TR, 8:30am – 9:10am

A high energy exercise class incorporating aerobics, weight bearing exercises, pilates, yoga, strength training, team played sports, kickboxing, and weight lifting.

PHE160A.1 Yoga/Pilates

1 credit. R, 5:30pm-6:20pm

BODYFLOW is the Yoga, Tai Chi, Pilates workout that builds flexibility and strength and leaves you feeling centered and calm. Controlled breathing, concentration and a carefully structured series of stretches, movesand poses to music create a holistic workout that brings the body into a state of harmony and balance. Required that students purchase a Yoga mat. $40 lab fee.

PHE115.1 Resistance Training and Conditioning

1 credit. R, 4:30pm – 5:20pm

This course will focus on strength training/BODYPUMP. Students are expected to sculpt, tone and strengthen their entire body, fast. Focusing on low weight loads and high repetition movements, students will burn fat, gain strength and quickly produce lean body muscle conditioning. The course will challenge all muscle groups while you squat, press, lift and curl. Yoga mat required. $40 lab fee.

PHE210.1 Introduction to Coaching

3 credits. R, MF, 9:30am-10:50am

This course will look at the various philosophies of coaching, history of sport, psychology of coaching, development of fundamentals, leadership, and program planning.

PHE230.1 Exercise Technique Prescription

3 credits. MF, 11:00am-12:20pm

A comprehensive analysis of strength and conditioning exercises. For each exercise, students will learn: correct technique, safety risks, and projection and assessment of outcomes. Students will evaluate the applicability of each exercise to a variety of sports.

Radiologic Sciences

RAD110.1 Radiographic Procedures I

College of St. Joseph’s Radiologic Sciences program is a closed major and registration is only open to matriculated students who are accepted into the program.

RAD112.1 Radiographic Science I

College of St. Joseph’s Radiologic Sciences program is a closed major and registration is only open to matriculated students who are accepted into the program.

RAD120.1 Film Critique I

College of St. Joseph’s Radiologic Sciences program is a closed major and registration is only open to matriculated students who are accepted into the program.

RAD150.1 Clinical Education I

College of St. Joseph’s Radiologic Sciences program is a closed major and registration is only open to matriculated students who are accepted into the program.

RAD310.1 Radiographic Procedures III

College of St. Joseph’s Radiologic Sciences program is a closed major and registration is only open to matriculated students who are accepted into the program.

RAD330.1 Radiographic Pathology

College of St. Joseph’s Radiologic Sciences program is a closed major and registration is only open to matriculated students who are accepted into the program.

RAD3501. Clinical Education III

College of St. Joseph’s Radiologic Sciences program is a closed major and registration is only open to matriculated students who are accepted into the program.

Religion

REL206.1 Faith Traditions

3 credits. TR, 1:00pm-2:20pm

This course provides students with the foundational concepts and beliefs of the major faith traditions with an emphasis on how these beliefs can be accommodated in the workplace and classroom. Students will read primary belief texts, write papers on ways these beliefs are embodied and perform in-class presentations.

REL260A.1/REL360A.1 Judaism

3 credits. T, 6:45pm-9:15pm

This course provides a general overview of Jewish history, beliefs and customs. Students will be exposed to primary texts including selections from the Hebrew Bible, Mishnah, Talmud and other classic texts as well as questions such as “Are Jews an ethnic group, a nationality or a religion?” Can one be an atheist (or a Buddhist) and still be Jewish? Depending on class interest, this course may include one or more field trips. No previous knowledge of Judaism is required.

Science

SCI105.1 Life Science I

3 credits. T, 6:45pm – 9:15pm

This is a liberal arts, interdisciplinary life science course covering basic concepts that includes the scientific method, the organization and complexity of living organisms, cells, energy transfer, the diversity of living organisms and animal physiology.

SCI260A.1 Forensic Science

3 credits. M, 6:45pm – 9:15pm

Provides students with knowledge and skills in the application of scientific principles and technological applications to further the purpose of justice in the study and resolution of criminal, civil and regulatory issues. $50 lab fee. Prerequisite: SCI105 or SCI106 for CRJ majors only.

SCI310.1 Nutrition

3 credits. R, 6:45pm – 9:15pm

An introductory course in basic nutrition including such topics as: digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins and minerals with a primary focus on health and disease prevention and nutrition information literacy.

Social Media

SOM201.1 Writing for the Web

3 credits. R, 4:00pm – 6:30pm

This course is designed to provide students with solid introductory knowledge of content creation and curation techniques for the Web, identifying the needs of an audience and the importance of style and grammar standards. Students will learn and execute various forms of writing, including blogging, journalistic writing, broadcast writing and distribution of content via social media. In addition, the course will cover broader topics including legal and ethical issues, such as libel and copyrights, and a look at the changes technology has brought, such as the shift in the influence of traditional media outlets.

Business Division

Accounting

ACC101.1 Financial Accounting

3 credits. TR, 11:00am – 12:20pm

Introduces students to generally accepted accounting principles and accounting process with regards to corporations, partnerships, and sole-proprietorships. The basic concepts, principles, and techniques used to generate accounting data, financial statements and the interpretation and use of financial data to enhance the decision-making process are covered.

ACC101.2 Financial Accounting

3 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am

Introduces students to generally accepted accounting principles and accounting process with regards to corporations, partnerships, and sole-proprietorships. The basic concepts, principles, and techniques used to generate accounting data, financial statements and the interpretation and use of financial data to enhance the decision-making process are covered.

ACC301.1 Auditing

3 credits. TR, 1:00pm – 2:20pm

Presents the theory of auditing and the proper procedures necessary to apply generally accepted theory. Emphasis is on internal control review and evaluation, on statistical sampling theory and application, and on procedural testing. Audit objectives, reports, procedures, and review are presented to understand the work of the public accountant in auditing.

ACC403.1 Federal Income Tax I

3 credits. TR, 4:00pm – 5:20pm

Provides instruction by application of federal income tax laws to incomes of individuals. Various tax returns are prepared. Includes a comprehensive explanation of the federal tax structure and training in the application of tax principles to specific problems. Prerequisite: ACC202.

ACC410.1 Research Methods I

3 credits. TR, 2:30pm-3:50pm

This course introduces the student to scientific assumptions and methodology that apply to research and program development, implementation, and evaluation in psychology as well as allied human service, business and educational disciplines. Individual and group designs will be examined as well as statistical and behavioral methods to analyze research results. As part of this course, students will develop a written proposal for a possible research project, although the study will not be completed in the course.

ACC442.1 Advanced Accounting

3 credits. TBA

A capstone course for Accounting majors develops the various concepts of present-day accounting and a critical evaluation of contemporary standards as they apply to mergers and acquisitions. The course includes accounting issues related to partnerships, not for profit organizations, and governmental units. Prerequisite: ACC202.

Business

BUS101.1 Introduction to Business

3 credits. TR, 1:00pm-2:20pm

This introductory course provides the student with an overview of business and its environment. Topics include business trends, globalization, forms of ownership, business law, entrepreneurship, management, leadership, human resource management, marketing, decision making, accounting, finance, business ethics, and social responsibility.

BUS101.2 Introduction to Business

3 credits. MF, 1:00pm-2:20pm

This introductory course provides the student with an overview of business and its environment. Topics include business trends, globalization, forms of ownership, business law, entrepreneurship, management, leadership, human resource management, marketing, decision making, accounting, finance, business ethics, and social responsibility.

BUS102.1 Business Math

3 credits. MF, 11:00am – 12:20pm

Teaches practical applications and skills which will be useful in a business career and in functioning as a concerned consumer. Subjects of study include: bank reconciliation, payroll, use of percents, simple interest, annuities, present value, future value, taxes, mark up and mark down, and financial statement analysis. Satisfies General Education math requirement.

BUS160A.1 World of Music

3 credits. MF, 11:00am – 12:20pm

This course seeks to explore the role of music in society through the many genres that co-exist in the age of global communications. Discussion will lead us through the careers related to the production and consumption of music, demographics of consumers, and economic and social impact.

BUS160B.1 Personal Finance

3 credits. TR, 4:00pm-5:20pm

BUS160C.1 HTML for Businesses

1 credit. Online.

Students will learn the basics of html and build a three-page website. As with any good website development course, students will be building the site themselves, as there is no better way to learn than by doing. Throughout the semester, assignments will build toward a final project that will tie together all of the semester’s topic.

BUS203.1 Business Communications

3 credits. MF, 11:00am – 12:20pm

Investigates the role of effective communication in the continuously changing organizational environment. Topics include communicating in the workplace, small groups and teams, listening and non-verbal communication, email messages, report writing, memoranda, letters, résumé preparation, job interviews, and formal presentations. Prerequisite ENG101; knowledge of PowerPoint is recommended.

BUS205.1 Principles of Management

3 credits. TR, 1:00pm – 2:20pm

Introduces basic management principles used in the organizational environment. The four management functions studied are planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Other topics include the evolution of management theory, ethics, social responsibility, diversity, organizational structure, human resource management, motivation, leadership, groups and teams, communication, organizational conflict and change, operations management, information systems and technology, innovation, product development, and entrepreneurship.

BUS211.1 Business Finance

3 credits. MF, 9:30am-10:50am

Studies the field of finance, both private and public, with emphasis placed on current approaches as they pertain to a business. The mathematics of finance, capital budgets, loan and investment alternatives and working capital management are discussed.

BUS216.1 Human Resource Management

3 credits. TR, 4:00pm-5:20pm

Presents the personnel responsibilities of both the line managers and the human resource department. Covers the specific subjects of equal employment laws and regulations, recruiting, selecting, training, and evaluating employees. Also, salaries, incentives, and empowerment are covered. Prerequisite: BUS205.

BUS260A.1 Writing for the Web

3 credits. R, 4:00pm-6:30pm

This course is designed to provide students with solid introductory knowledge of content creation and curation techniques for the Web, identifying the needs of an audience and the importance of style and grammar standards. Students will learn and execute various forms of writing, including blogging, journalistic writing, broadcast writing and distribution of content via social media. In addition, the course will cover broader topics including legal and ethical issues, such as libel and copyrights, and a look at the changes technology has brought, such as the shift in the influence of traditional media outlets.

BUS303.1 Business Law

3 credits. MF, 1:00pm-2:20pm

Investigates the essential elements of business law and the legal environment. Topics include introduction to civil and criminal law, business ethics, the judicial system, torts, negligence, strict liability, contracts, Uniform Commercial Code, negotiable instruments, agency, business associations, intellectual property, employment law, consumer and environmental law, property, and legal case analysis.

BUS307.1 Organizational Behavior

3 credits. TR, 11:00am-12:20pm

Examines individuals, groups, and intergroup relations that occur within an organizational environment. Topics include leadership, motivation, and conflict resolution.

BUS309.1 Marketing

3 credits. TR, 2:30pm-3:50pm

Examines the foundations of marketing principles with application of marketing concepts of the present and future. Emphasis is placed on problem solving, critical thinking skills, ethics, and competition while studying the topics of market analysis, target marketing, product pricing, strategic promotion, and distribution. Sophomore standing.

BUS352.1 Introduction to e-Business and Commerce

3 credits. MF, 2:30pm-3:50pm

Introduces the concepts of electronic business transactions and commerce through an examination of the evolution of the Internet and World Wide Web. Topics include Internet-related hardware and software, communication protocols, and the use of Structure Query Language for web database transactions.

BUS409.1 Organizational Design

3 credits. MF, 9:30am-10:50am

Explores the theories of complex organizations and their application to designing and implementing a structural configuration for an organization. Topics include Organizational Structure, Organizational Development (OD), and the role of a change agent.

Computer Information Systems

CIS305.1 Spreadsheet Applications Microsoft Excel

3 credits. TR, 9:30am – 10:50am

Discusses business oriented data management techniques using Microsoft Excel electronic spreadsheet. Topics include: planning a spreadsheet, entering labels, values, formulae, and functions; macros, databases, and graphics will also be covered. $20 lab fee.

Economics

ECO101.1 Introduction to Economics

3 credits. MF, 11:00am-12:20pm

Provides an introduction to economic analysis. Topics will include classical economics (free market system), socialism, communism, and global trade and finance. Special emphasis on understanding the United States economy. Major economic thinkers including Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and John Kenneth Galbraith will be considered. Satisfies a Social Science Requirement.

ECO207.1 Macroeconomic Principles

3 credits. M, 4:00pm-6:30pm

Presents the basic principles of macroeconomics including supply and demand. The course examines the national economy and its main components. Various theories of inflation, unemployment and GDP growth are explored, as well as the tools of macroeconomic principles. The role of the federal budget, money supply, interest rates in economic stabilization policies, global economic factors and international trade are emphasized. Sophomore standing.

Sports Management

SPM101.1 Introduction to Sports Management

3 credits. MF, 2:30pm-3:50pm

Introduces the structure of the sports industry and the application of management principles. Topics include the history of sports management, facility and event management, and sports agencies

SPM401.1 Legal Aspects of Sports Management

3 credits. MF, 1:00pm-2:20pm

Familiarizes students through the use of court cases with the application of legal principles as they apply to professional and amateur sports. Topics include tort and criminal liability, contract law, and constitutional law. Prerequisite: BUS 303. Junior standing.

Criminal Justice

CRJ101.1 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 credits. MF, 2:30-3:50pm

This course offers a comprehensive survey of the administration and organization of criminal justice from arrest through final adjudication. The course begins with an overview of the criminal justice system followed by in-depth discussions on crime, victimization and criminal justice policy. Students are introduced to the evolution of the various components of the criminal justice system (police, prosecution, courts and corrections), the effects of each component and the role of discretion in each.

CRJ230.1 Drugs & Society

3 credits. TR, 8:00am-9:20am

Examines the issues revolving around drug use and abuse within American society. Themes include the role of societal definitions and social responses to drugs, socio-historical perspectives on drug consumption and control, the structure of the legal and illegal drug industry, and competing models of public policy.

CRJ250.1 Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Class

3 credits. TR, 11:00am-12:20pm

Provides students with an opportunity to analyze the roles of race, ethnicity, gender and class in crime and criminal justice systems. Covers historical and theoretical frameworks for understanding the relationship between socio-demographic factors and criminal justice.

CRJ260A.1/CRJ360A.1 Violence

3 credits. T, 4:00pm-6:30pm

CRJ281.1 Policing in America

3 credits. TR, 2:30pm-3:50pm

Examines the history, evolution and organization of the police in the United States and their role in society, the structure and culture of police organizations, function and activities of the police, and police deviance and accountability.

CRJ282.1 Corrections

3 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am

Examines the concept of punishment and its form, function(s) and enforcement throughout history, with an emphasis on current sentencing policies and procedures and their impact on the corrections system. Explores the operation, structure, clientele and issues confronting the institutions, agencies and programs encompassing the corrections system including jails, prisons, and probation and parole.

CRJ285.1 Criminal Procedure

3 credits. R, 4:00pm – 6:30pm

A comprehensive study of the investigative and adjudicatory stages of the criminal process, through trial, including an analysis of constitutional and statutory provisions, and judicial decisions (particularly those of the Supreme Court of the United States and the Vermont Supreme Court) governing the various procedural steps in the administration of criminal justice in federal and state courts.

CRJ314.1 Defensive Tactics/Skills

3 credits. MF,  1:00pm-2:20pm

This course is designed to provide students with an appropriate understanding of specific issues related to conflict and crisis management within the criminal justice field. Students gain a precise understanding of response procedures and use of force techniques that are fundamental to law enforcement and corrections. Prerequisite: CRJ281 or CRJ282.

CRJ350.1 Forensic Science

3 credits. M, 6:45pm – 9:15pm

Provides students with knowledge and skills in the application of scientific principles and technological applications to further the purpose of justice in the study and resolution of criminal, civil and regulatory issues. $50 lab fee.

Public Safety

PSA101.1 Introduction to Public Safety

3 credits. MF, 9:30am – 10:50am

This course provides an introduction to critical issues related to public safety administration and an understanding of the laws, programs, agencies and institution involved in the provision of public safety. This includes the development and administration of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery programs to address challenges related to environmental and natural disasters to the nature and operation of correctional institutions, schools and colleges.

Education Division

ECE301.1 Introduction to Early Childhood Education

3 credits. W, 4:30pm-7:00pm

This course introduces students to the historical perspectives, theories, practice, current trends and developments in early childhood education. The foundations of the education profession, the diverse educational settings for young children, professionalism, and planning developmentally appropriate programs will be explored. Various pedagogical approaches will be examined that promote the development and learning of children ages birth to age 8.

Psychology & Human Services Division

Human Services

HUS216.1 Evaluation Techniques

3 credits. TR, 11:00am-12:20pm

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the philosophy, techniques, and role of assessment in designing and evaluating individual client treatment and agency-level programs within the area of human services. The course is designed to aid in the understanding of basic psychometric concepts and the interpretation of standardized tests.

HUS217.1 Personality, Theory and Evaluation

3 credits. TR, 11:00am-12:20pm

HUS305.1 Theories of Personality

3 credits. TR, 11:00am-12:20pm

This course will survey major counseling approaches focusing on basic concepts, therapeutic processes, the nature of the client/therapist relationship, and specific procedures applicable to individual and group situations. Professional, ethical and legal issues which impact on the counselor will be examined, and special attention will be given in helping students assess their own values and communication styles as a prerequisite to counseling others through a required interpersonal skills field experience.

HUS406.1 Family Counseling & Mediation

3 credits. W, 6:45pm-9:15pm

Students are instructed in the skills of assessing a client’s unique treatment or program needs, designing a treatment or service plan, delivering a course of counseling, documenting and evaluating progress, and working within a team approach in order to ensure that appropriate services are provided to clients. As part of the course, students will focus on refining their skills to develop and maintain effective relationships with clients, and practice specific counseling strategies and techniques in the context of simulated individual and group counseling situations.

Psychology

PSY102.1 Introduction to Psychology

3 credits. TR, 8:00am – 9:20am

This course provides an overview of the major areas of psychological study including biology and behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, intelligence, language, motivation, emotion, abnormal psychology, and therapy. Historical and current theoretical approaches to understanding human behavior will be reviewed and the student will be introduced to scientific methods of inquiry in psychology. This is a basic course intended for both psychology majors and others interested in the field of psychology.

PSY102.2 Introduction to Psychology

3 credits. TR, 8:00am-9:20pm

This course provides an overview of the major areas of psychological study including biology and behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, intelligence, language, motivation, emotion, abnormal psychology, and therapy. Historical and current theoretical approaches to understanding human behavior will be reviewed and the student will be introduced to scientific methods of inquiry in psychology. This is a basic course intended for both psychology majors and others interested in the field of psychology.

PSY121.1 Stress Management

1 credit. M, 4:30pm-5:20pm

Helps individuals understand what stress is, the effect stress has on health and ways to minimize the negative effects of stress. This course is designed to allow students to actually experience a variety of different relaxation techniques – including imagery mediation progressive muscle relaxation and yoga. Participants will be challenged to reformulate their habits of dealing with stress.

PSY201.1 Principles of Learning

3 credits. MF, 2:30pm – 3:50pm

An investigation is conducted with respect to learning principles derived from classical and operant conditioning. The student is led through a step-by-step examination of processes such as response acquisition, extension, relearning higher order conditioning, generalization, and discrimination, principles and schedules of reinforcement, punishment, and other related processes. Emphasis is placed on developing a solid understanding of basic scientific principles and an opportunity for utilizing data collection and experimental design procedures is part of a field experience.

PSY203.1 Child Adolescent Development

3 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am

Students will explore principles and theories of child growth and development from birth through adolescence, focusing on ages 5- 18. The course will address physical, social, emotional and cognitive domains of development and their application to developmental theories and milestones, as well as the influences of family, community institutions and culture on child and youth development. Focus areas will include developmental assets children and youth need to succeed, and applications of such concepts to youth program development. Prerequisite: PSY103.

PSY240.1 Sports Psychology

3 credits. R, 4:00pm-6:30pm

This course provides an overview of the emerging field of sports psychology. This is a basic course designed to familiarize athletes and other health conscious individuals with techniques of skills improvement. There will be an emphasis on the practices of psychological techniques of health/fitness maintenance. PSY102 is recommended as a prerequisite.

PSY260A.1/PSY360A.1 Violence

3 credits. T, 4:00pm-6:30pm

PSY260B.1 Drugs & Society

3 credits. TR, 8:00am-9:20am

Examines the issues revolving around drug use and abuse within American society. Themes include the role of societal definitions and social responses to drugs, socio-historical perspectives on drug consumption and control, the structure of the legal and illegal drug industry, and competing models of public policy.

PSY260C.1/PSY360B.1 BAZINGA! A Personality Study of The Big Bang Theory

3 credits. MF, 1:00pm-2:20pm

This course will examine the unique personalities portrayed in CBS Television’s hit series The Big Bang Theory, created by Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady. Coursework will include viewing key episodes and analyzing the interactions of Sheldon, Leonard, Penny, Raj, Howard, Bernadette, Amy, and even Stuart.

PSY304.1 Abnormal Psychology

3 credits. TR, 2:30pm-3:50pm

This course examines the etiology and treatment of abnormal human behaviors. Areas of study include: historical and current approaches to conceptualizing abnormal behavior, and a review of the characteristics and treatment of organic and functional disorders described in the current edition of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (including areas such as anxiety, affective and personality disorders, schizophrenia, impaired brain disorders and disorders of childhood.) Prerequisites: PSY102. Sophomore standing.

PSY329.1 Infant and Early Childhood Development

3 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am

This course provides an in-depth study of major developmental theories, concepts, and issues which are pertinent to infancy and preschool age children. The importance of this formative period of development will be addressed from a multi-dimensional perspective. Effective parenting and early education strategies will be studied, as well as issues and disorders which can begin to emerge at this time of life. Field research will be an integral part of this course. Sophomore standing.

PSY330.1 Child Growth and Development

3 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am

This course will provide a detailed investigation into current family systems and lifestyle patterns, with a focus on healthy child rearing practices. The course will provide a review of development from birth through early childhood, and then emphasize the development of the child through late childhood until the onset of adolescence. Physical, social, emotional, behavioral, educational, and other issues will be examined as well as disorders which are relevant to this period of development. Applied learning activities and field experiences will be important components of this course. Sophomore standing.

PSY331.1 Issues in Adolescence

3 credits. TR, 9:30am-10:50am

This course will examine the major psychological, social and physiological changes that occur as children develop into adolescents, through the teenage years, and into young adulthood. Issues explored will include the process of individualization and development of self-identity, the importance of peer relationships, the emergence of sexuality, and idealism. Special focus will be placed on relevant issues such as maintenance of positive relationships with parents, alcohol/substance abuse, adolescent depression and suicide, as well as legal and judicial issues in cases involving adolescents. Students will have the opportunity to interact with various professionals in the field. A minimum of 10 hours fieldwork is required. Students in secondary licensure programs must complete their fieldwork in a middle and/or high school setting. Sophomore standing.

PSY424.1 Health Psychology

3 credits. R, 4:00pm-6:30pm

This course will examine the interrelationships between physical health and psychological factors. Research regarding the influence of biological contributions and life experiences in health maintenance and the onset of medical illness and psychological disorders will be covered. Roles and relationships of various medical and allied health providers as well as various diagnostic and treatment techniques will be discussed. Opportunities for field research will be provided. Junior standing.

PSY450.1 History and Systems

3 credits. M, 4:00pm-6:30pm

This is a seminar capstone course for Psychology majors. This course will examine the philosophical origins, development, and parameters of the field of psychology from Greek Naturalism through present day scientific psychology, with emphasis placed on the current status, issues, and areas of application in the field. Students explore the 209 history, evolution, current status and future directions of psychology as a science and a profession. The inter-relatedness of the science to other fields of inquiry, cultural and global issues will be emphasized. Prerequisites PSY102. Senior Standing.