Requirements for Community Counseling: Alcohol and Substance Abuse

CourseCreditsDescription

Foundation Courses

GPS500 Ethics and Foundations of Counseling3This course examines the ethical, legal and foundational issues that confront professional counselors in various mental health and educational settings and roles. The history of the profession of counseling is reviewed and the role of the counselor is explored. The course is designed to teach students how to think ethically and to understand the relationship between the counseling profession, the legal system and the community. Students will learn and practice utilizing a values-based ethical decision making process to address ethical dilemmas. Professional training and credentialing requirements as well as various career opportunities in Vermont and surrounding states will be reviewed. Professional issues such as disclosure and privacy regulations, liability and risk management practices, insurance, professional collaboration and consultation, impact of culture, legal issues and health maintenance practices will be reviewed. Fall course.
GPS500B Ethics & Foundations of Alcohol & Substance Abuse Counseling3This course examines the ethical, legal and foundational issues that confront professional counselors in a variety of settings and roles within the context of alcohol and substance abuse treatment, as well as issues regarding mental and behavioral health, within families, communities and social institutions. Key foundational issues include identifying and appreciating one's personal and professional values as they may impact ethical standards regarding expected comportment, roles and responsibilities in working with individuals, groups, families and other stakeholders (e.g. within agencies). Within the client/counselor/agency relationship the interface of ethics and policy, practice and service delivery will include such topics as diversity, health, substance use/abuse/ dependence, violence, bio-ethics and others. Professional practice includes being effective in understanding the meanings and scope of ethical practice to incorporate the management of issues such as disclosure and privacy regulations, best practice/empirical practice mandates, insurance and managed care (to also include health care reform). These conflicts can carry with it professional, legal and personal liability, and such risks are be managed effectively by practitioners. Particular emphasis will be placed on rules and conditions outline in 42 CFR, regarding confidentiality and protections for those engaged in alcohol and substance abuse treatment, at all phases of the treatment continuum. This course is designed to help students define and refine their ability to respond to professional issues ethically and to understand the relationship between professional practice and its connections with the legal system and social institutions. Students will learn and practice utilizing a values-based ethical decision making process to address ethical dilemmas. Fall course.
GPS501 Development Psychology 3This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth review of developmental theory. Developmental stages are examined with an eye to intellectual, psychosocial, moral, and physical growth of the human being. Students will also be exposed to behavioral disorders and treatment concerns across the life span. Students are required to complete field observations in school, agency, or community settings, depending on their degree plan. Fall course.
GPS504 Advanced Abnormal Psychology3The focus of this course is on diagnosis and treatment interventions for handicapping conditions and disorders of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Major treatment approaches and modalities will be discussed, and those which emphasize clients’ strengths will be given priority. Students will learn to use the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association. Advantages and disadvantages of diagnostic classification systems will be reviewed. Case scenarios dealing with infant, child, adolescent, and adult treatment methods will be presented to give students an opportunity to practice their diagnostic skills, as well as to develop treatment plans, based on hypothetical cases, using an electronic case record system. Spring course.
GPS507 Psychological Appraisal3This course provides a survey of psychological procedures. Ethical standards for developing and using various assessment procedures will be reviewed as defined by the APA. An overview of the purpose, theory and techniques of assessment as a basis for designing and evaluating client treatment plans and agency level programs within human service agencies and educational settings will be addressed. The student will develop knowledge of observation and interview techniques, the manner in which standardized tests are administered, scored and interpreted, as well as the manner in which results are disseminated in professional reports. Fall course.
GPS518 Diversity & Professional Relationships3This course addresses the issues of cultural diversity. The course takes into consideration the specific values, beliefs and actions that are conditioned by a person's ethnicity, gender, religion, socioeconomic status, political views, life-styles and geographic region. The following are investigated as they relate to the aforementioned: time, self-disclosure, family values, nonverbal behavior, trusting relationships, self-actualization, directedness and assertiveness. Students are challenged to look at their cultural biases and stereotypical beliefs that may influence the therapeutic process and to look for bridges that can influence and assist in the process of relation. Spring course.

Specialty Courses

GPS522 Foundations of Alcohol and Substance Counseling3This course explores issues of substance abuse and chemical dependency with a discussion of the relationships between mood-altering substances and behavior, including tobacco and caffeine. The course will discuss other aspects of addiction such as gambling, family dysfunctions and behavioral and personality disorders, and other co-occurring mental health disorders which can be causative and resultant factors associated with addiction. Phases of addiction and recovery and current treatment approaches for children and adults will be explored (such as 12 step, peer support, medical, psychosocial, relapse prevention and intervention models), with opportunities for practice and field work provided. Information related to the spectrum of institutional and community-based services will be reviewed along with information related to promoting health maintenance and prevention of diseases (such as HIV/AIDS, STDs, Tuberculosis (TB) and other infectious diseases. Spring course.
GPS514 Adolescence, Alcohol and Substance Abuse 3The use and abuse of alcohol and other chemical substances most commonly begins in adolescence. This course will focus on the nature and scope of adolescent substance abuse, other addictions such as gambling and other and mental health disorders, and related issues including: stressors associated with normal adolescent development, diagnostic considerations, legal involvement, best practice interventions, special treatment needs, and how communities can help solve the problems associated with adolescent substance abuse.
GPS525 Psychopharmacology3The biological bases of behavior will first be reviewed with an emphasis placed on the brain, nervous system and genetics as they relate to normal and abnormal behavior. The course will then focus on their identification, uses and cautions regarding various types of psychotropic medications which are utilized for treating different psychological disorders. Implications of psychotropic medication use will be addressed and models for the use and evaluation of conjoint medical and psychotherapeutic approaches will be emphasized. Issues related to abuse of various psychoactive medications, interaction effects and information and controversies related to the use of agonist therapy for patients with alcohol and other drug dependence will be discussed. Fall course.
GPS546B Alcohol, Drugs & Society II3This course continues to explore and understand the complexities associated with the use and misuse of drugs and alcohol, through a social frame of reference. Part two looks at the drug related industries, the alcohol industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceutical industry, the illegal drug industry, the drug treatment industry and the social institutions that affect industry and ways in which industry affects society. Also, within each area of focus, students will have an appreciation of core policy issues to include drug use during pregnancy, a smoke free society, mandatory sentencing, compulsory drug treatment, medically assisted therapy and the movement to legalize marijuana use. Prerequisite: GPS546A.

General Counseling Courses

GPS502 Advanced Theories of Psychotherapy3This course provides an opportunity for students to develop both breadth and depth of knowledge regarding major theories of human behavior that have been developed during the past 100 years. Students will begin to develop their own theory of psychotherapy by comparing and contrasting those theories in terms of their philosophical foundations, theoretical concepts and applications to the field of counseling. A central outcome of the course is for students to present their own theoretical perspective for review and discussion. Fall course.
GPS505 Group Counseling3This course examines the group process of psychotherapy. Students will discuss major theoretical perspectives and will be given an opportunity to develop a group and to facilitate the group process. Groups for children, adolescents, adults, families, and the elderly will be analyzed. Stages of group development, group theory, cross cultural and gender issues, as well as ethical and professional guidelines involved in group work will be major themes of this course. Spring course.
GPS506 Family System & Counseling3This course is designed to facilitate an understanding of current concepts and theories of human dynamics using a system approach. The major theoretical perspectives will be presented for students to discuss and evaluate. Students will be asked to demonstrate, for class observation and discussion, one of the major theoretical models. Implications for appropriate therapeutic intervention in dysfunctional family functioning, as well as ethical practices, will be addressed. Fall course.
GPS519 Counseling Techniques3This course is designed to help students develop and maintain effective counseling relationships with clients. Specific counseling strategies and techniques for children, adolescents and adults will be reviewed and practiced in the context of simulated individual sessions and in the context of a group experience conducted as part of the course. Students will practice skills related to conducting initial interviews, establishing treatment objectives, using various treatment procedures and homework assignments, terminating sessions and managing the counseling relationship. Students will learn to utilize an electronic case record system. Special issues related to ethical standards, diagnostic nomenclature, children and adolescents, managed care and short-term counseling and other topical issues within the field will be covered. Spring course.

Field Work

3Choose one 3-credit course from the following:
GPS538 Alcohol & Substance Abuse Field Experience I (300 Hrs)3These are experiential courses where students apply their theoretical knowledge and counseling skills in a structured setting under supervision by faculty and other licensed, practicing, counseling professionals in the sponsoring agency. Students will complete a minimum of 200 clock hours in the field each semester, in addition to attending weekly coordinating seminar sessions on campus. Course size is limited. Students are required to talk with their advisors early in the semester that precedes the field
experience. Field Experience I is normally completed in the fall semester, with Field Experience II completed in the spring semester. Obtained criminal background and child abuse clearance checks. Prerequisite: Candidacy status, good academic standing and advisor consent. $200 Field Experience Fee. 3 credits each, a total of six credits is required.
GPS539 Alcohol & Substance Abuse Field Experience II (300 Hrs)3These are experiential courses where students apply their theoretical knowledge and counseling skills in a structured setting under supervision by faculty and other licensed, practicing, counseling professionals in the sponsoring agency. Students will complete a minimum of 200 clock hours in the field each semester, in addition to attending weekly coordinating seminar sessions on campus. Course size is limited. Students are required to talk with their advisors early in the semester that precedes the field
experience. Field Experience I is normally completed in the fall semester, with Field Experience II completed in the spring semester. Obtained criminal background and child abuse clearance checks. Prerequisite: Candidacy status, good academic standing and advisor consent. $200 Field Experience Fee. 3 credits each, a total of six credits is required.
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