Requirements for the Master of Science in Clinical Psychology

CourseCreditsDescription
GPS500 Ethics and Foundations of Counseling*3This course examines the ethical, legal and foundational issues that confront professional counselors in various mental health and educational settings and roles. The history of the profession of counseling is reviewed and the role of the counselor is explored. The course is designed to teach students how to think ethically and to understand the relationship between the counseling profession, the legal system and the community. Students will learn and practice utilizing a values-based ethical decision making process to address ethical dilemmas. Professional training and credentialing requirements as well as various career opportunities in Vermont and surrounding states will be reviewed. Professional issues such as disclosure and privacy regulations, liability and risk management practices, insurance, professional collaboration and consultation, impact of culture, legal issues and health maintenance practices will be reviewed. Fall course.
GPS501 Developmental Psychology*3This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth review of developmental theory. Developmental stages are examined with an eye to intellectual, psychosocial, moral, and physical growth of the human being. Students will also be exposed to behavioral disorders and treatment concerns across the life span. Students are required to complete field observations in school, agency, or community settings, depending on their degree plan. Fall course.
GPS502 Advanced Theories of Psychotherapy*3This course provides an opportunity for students to develop both breadth and depth of knowledge regarding major theories of human behavior that have been developed during the past 100 years. Students will begin to develop their own theory of psychotherapy by comparing and contrasting those theories in terms of their philosophical foundations, theoretical concepts and applications to the field of counseling. A central outcome of the course is for students to present their own theoretical perspective for review and discussion. Fall course.
GPS503 Research Methods3This course looks at the methods of scientific investigation, experimental and non-experimental methods, appropriate analysis of data, procedures of developing, analyzing, and interpreting original research problems, and critical analysis of published research. Spring course.
GPS504 Advanced Abnormal Psychology*3The focus of this course is on diagnosis and treatment interventions for handicapping conditions and disorders of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Major treatment approaches and modalities will be discussed, and those which emphasize clients’ strengths will be given priority. Students will learn to use the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association. Advantages and disadvantages of diagnostic classification systems will be reviewed. Case scenarios dealing with infant, child, adolescent, and adult treatment methods will be presented to give students an opportunity to practice their diagnostic skills, as well as to develop treatment plans, based on hypothetical cases, using an electronic case record system. Spring course.
GPS505 Group Counseling3This course examines the group process of psychotherapy. Students will discuss major theoretical perspectives and will be given an opportunity to develop a group and to facilitate the group process. Groups for children, adolescents, adults, families, and the elderly will be analyzed. Stages of group development, group theory, cross cultural and gender issues, as well as ethical and professional guidelines involved in group work will be major themes of this course. Spring course.
GPS507 Psychological Appraisal*3This course provides a survey of psychological procedures. Ethical standards for developing and using various assessment procedures will be reviewed as defined by the APA. An overview of the purpose, theory and techniques of assessment as a basis for designing and evaluating client treatment plans and agency level programs within human service agencies and educational settings will be addressed. The student will develop knowledge of observation and interview techniques, the manner in which standardized tests are administered, scored and interpreted, as well as the manner in which results are disseminated in professional reports. Fall course.
GPS508 Intellectual Assessment*3This course examines the theory and methodology of cognitive assessment. Students will learn to administer, score and interpret the Wechsler Scales and other similar evaluation instruments. Prerequisite: Matriculation in Clinical Psychology program and/or permission of advisor and Division Chairperson. Fall course.
GPS509 Personality Assessment*3Personality is assessed through the use of clinical techniques including observation, interview, objective paper and pencil instruments and projective techniques. Students will learn to administer, score and interpret such instruments as the MMPI-2, Millon, TAT and/or H-T-P. The dynamics of the assessment process and report writing will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Open to Clinical Psychology majors only and/or permission of advisor and Division Chairperson. Spring course.
GPS518 Diversity and Professional Relationships*3This course addresses the issues of cultural diversity. The course takes into consideration the specific values, beliefs and actions that are conditioned by a person's ethnicity, gender, religion, socioeconomic status, political views, life-styles and geographic region. The following are investigated as they relate to the aforementioned: time, self-disclosure, family values, nonverbal behavior, trusting relationships, self-actualization, directedness and assertiveness. Students are challenged to look at their cultural biases and stereotypical beliefs that may influence the therapeutic process and to look for bridges that can influence and assist in the process of relation. Spring course.
GPS519 Counseling Techniques*3This course is designed to help students develop and maintain effective counseling relationships with clients. Specific counseling strategies and techniques for children, adolescents and adults will be reviewed and practiced in the context of simulated individual sessions and in the context of a group experience conducted as part of the course. Students will practice skills related to conducting initial interviews, establishing treatment objectives, using various treatment procedures and homework assignments, terminating sessions and managing the counseling relationship. Students will learn to utilize an electronic case record system. Special issues related to ethical standards, diagnostic nomenclature, children and adolescents, managed care and short-term counseling and other topical issues within the field will be covered. Spring course.
GPS522 Foundations of Alcohol and Substance Abuse3This course explores issues of substance abuse and chemical dependency with a discussion of the relationships between mood-altering substances and behavior, including tobacco and caffeine. The course will discuss other aspects of addiction such as gambling, family dysfunctions and behavioral and personality disorders, and other co-occurring mental health disorders which can be causative and resultant factors associated with addiction. Phases of addiction and recovery and current treatment approaches for children and adults will be explored (such as 12 step, peer support, medical, psychosocial, relapse prevention and intervention models), with opportunities for practice and field work provided. Information related to the spectrum of institutional and community-based services will be reviewed along with information related to promoting health maintenance and prevention of diseases (such as HIV/AIDS, STDs, Tuberculosis (TB) and other infectious diseases. Spring course.
GPS525 Psychopharmacology3The biological bases of behavior will first be reviewed with an emphasis placed on the brain, nervous system and genetics as they relate to normal and abnormal behavior. The course will then focus on their identification, uses and cautions regarding various types of psychotropic medications which are utilized for treating different psychological disorders. Implications of psychotropic medication use will be addressed and models for the use and evaluation of conjoint medical and psychotherapeutic approaches will be emphasized. Issues related to abuse of various psychoactive medications, interaction effects and information and controversies related to the use of agonist therapy for patients with alcohol and other drug dependence will be discussed. Fall course.
GPS531 Clinical Psychology Field Experience I*3These are experiential courses where students apply their theoretical knowledge and counseling skills in a structured setting under supervision by faculty and other licensed, practicing, counseling professionals in the sponsoring agency. Students will complete a minimum of 200 clock hours in the field each semester, in addition to attending weekly coordinating seminar sessions on campus. Course size is limited. Students are required to talk with their advisors early in the semester that precedes the field
experience. Field Experience I is normally completed in the fall semester, with Field Experience II completed in the spring semester. Obtained criminal background and child abuse clearance checks. Prerequisite: Candidacy status, good academic standing and advisor consent. $200 Field Experience Fee. 3 credits each, a total of six credits is required.
GPS532 Clinical Psychology Field Experience II*3These are experiential courses where students apply their theoretical knowledge and counseling skills in a structured setting under supervision by faculty and other licensed, practicing, counseling professionals in the sponsoring agency. Students will complete a minimum of 200 clock hours in the field each semester, in addition to attending weekly coordinating seminar sessions on campus. Course size is limited. Students are required to talk with their advisors early in the semester that precedes the field
experience. Field Experience I is normally completed in the fall semester, with Field Experience II completed in the spring semester. Obtained criminal background and child abuse clearance checks. Prerequisite: Candidacy status, good academic standing and advisor consent. $200 Field Experience Fee. 3 credits each, a total of six credits is required.
GPS540 Thesis3The thesis is an empirical study of a particular hypothesis in the field of psychology. The study should contribute to the empirical knowledge base of psychology. Prerequisites: GPS503 and advisor consent. Fall and Spring course.
GPS551 Clinical Psychology Field Experience III*3These are experiential courses where students apply their theoretical knowledge and counseling skills in a structured, clinical field setting under supervision by faculty and a qualified mental health professional in the sponsoring agency. Students will complete a minimum of 300 clock hours in the field each semester, in addition to attending weekly coordinating seminar sessions on campus. Course size is limited. Students are required to talk with their advisors early in the semester that precedes the field experience. Field Experience III is normally completed in the fall semester, with Field Experience IV completed in the spring semester. Obtained criminal background and child abuse clearance checks. Prerequisite: Candidacy status, good academic standing and advisor consent. $200 Field Experience Fee. 3 credits each; a total of six credits is required.
GPS552 Clinical Psychology Field Experience IV*3These are experiential courses where students apply their theoretical knowledge and counseling skills in a structured, clinical field setting under supervision by faculty and a qualified mental health professional in the sponsoring agency. Students will complete a minimum of 300 clock hours in the field each semester, in addition to attending weekly coordinating seminar sessions on campus. Course size is limited. Students are required to talk with their advisors early in the semester that precedes the field experience. Field Experience III is normally completed in the fall semester, with Field Experience IV completed in the spring semester. Obtained criminal background and child abuse clearance checks. Prerequisite: Candidacy status, good academic standing and advisor consent. $200 Field Experience Fee. 3 credits each; a total of six credits is required.
Thesis students take one elective3Thesis students are required to take three elective credits
GPS506 Family Systems (non thesis students)3This course is designed to facilitate an understanding of current concepts and theories of human dynamics using a system approach. The major theoretical perspectives will
be presented for students to discuss and evaluate. Students will be asked to demonstrate, for class observation and discussion, one of the major theoretical models. Implications for appropriate therapeutic intervention in dysfunctional family functioning, as well as ethical practices, will be addressed. Fall course.
Electives (non-thesis students)6Non-thesis students are required to take six elective credits.
Total60