The following is a selection of courses you might take as a Health Science major.

BIO101 Biology I

This is an introductory Biology course covering basic biological concepts including scientific method, evolution, the diversity of life, plants and ecology.  This course is suitable for health science and radiography majors and counts toward the natural science component of the College Core Curriculum. Lab coat required. $125 lab fee. 4 credits.

BIO102 Biology II

This is an introductory Biology course covering basic biological concepts including scientific method, cells, genetics, animal development and animal form and function. This course is suitable for health science and radiography majors. Lab coat required. Prerequisite: BIO101. $125 lab fee. 4 credits.

BIO201 Medical Terminology

Medical terminology is the specialized language of health care practitioners.  In this course, students will be immersed in word roots, prefixes, suffixes, eponyms and abbreviations used in medical language.  Students will be expected to discern meanings and pronunciations of medical terms in general, and for medical language specific to body regions, organs and organ systems, tissues, medical diagnoses and procedures and diseases and disease treatment. 1 credit.

BIO211 Health Science Careers

This course requires students to explore specific aspects of their chosen career.  For example, students will research educational requirements, professional licensure requirements, costs, employment opportunities and requirements, potential income, challenges and quality of life expectations.  Students will also be required to write a resume and curriculum vita that is appropriate for health professionals. Sophomore standing. 3 credits.

BIO217 Health Science Practicum

This course requires students to obtain 500 hours of direct patient contact in an appropriate clinical setting. Students will work in a setting that fulfills specific career requirements to obtain necessary skills and experience. Students will be expected to prove competency and professionalism in health care settings and to assess their own personal attributes regarding their desire to work in a health related career. Sophomore standing. 3 credits.

BIO221 Medical Coding and Billing I

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to hospital diagnosis coding concepts, nomenclature and ICD-10-CM classification systems, including discussion of various i-patient reimbursement systems, basic current hospital diagnosis coding systems and guidelines and other pertinent topics. Prerequisite: BIO102, BIO231 and BIO201. 1 credit.

BIO222 Medical Coding and Billing II

This is an advanced coding course that covers complex cases using medical record reports. Students will read and interpret data and apply the principles of reimbursement and coding at an advanced level, utilizing the AHA ―Official Inpatient Coding Guidelines‖ to identify and sequence the principal diagnosis and procedure accurately. Coding discussions will include determining proper diagnoses or procedures, ambulatory coding and ambulatory reimbursement and payment systems. Prerequisite: BIO221. 1 credit.

BIO231 Anatomy & Physiology I

This course is designed as an introduction to anatomy and physiology of the human body.  This course will cover chemical, cellular, tissue, organ and organ systems levels of organization. Homeostasis, the central, unifying concept of human physiology, is applied to the integument and to the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. The anatomy and physiology of the integument and the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems will be examined, as will the special senses. Lab coat required. $125 lab fee. 4 credits.

BIO232 Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is designed as an introduction to anatomy and physiology of the human body.  This course will cover chemical, cellular, tissue, organ and organ systems levels of organization.  Homeostasis, the central unifying concept of human physiology, is applied to nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems.  The anatomy and physiology of the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems will be examined, as will metabolism, fluid electrolyte and acid-base balance and development and inheritance. Lab coat required. Prerequisite: BIO321. $125 lab fee. 4 credits.

BIO241 Genetics

Genetics is a branch of biological science that affects every other biological discipline. Understanding the role that genetics plays in life is essential for any student of biology. This introductory course, required of all Health Science majors, will allow students to obtain the knowledge required to understand the role of genetics in all levels of life, from molecules to ecosystems.  Topics discussed in this course will include, but are not limited to, genes, chromosomes, linkage, inheritance, DNA structure and analysis, DNA recombination and replication, translation, mutation, gene expression, genomics, proteomics, cancer, genetic engineering, developmental genetics, quantitative genetics, population and evolutionary genetics, conservation genetics, epigenetics, DNA forensics, genomics and personalized medicine and stem cells. Prerequisite: BIO102. 4 credits.

BIO251 Microbiology

This is an introductory microbiology course required for Health Science majors. Concepts covered in this course will include the metabolism, growth, molecular biology, gene expression, and genomics of microorganisms, virology, microbial evolution and diversity, microbial ecology, pathogenicity, antimicrobial agents and immunology.  Lab coat required. Prerequisite: BIO102 and BIO241.4 credits.

BIO310 Nutrition

An introductory course in basic nutrition including digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, fat, protein, vitamins and minerals.  Also, there will be a primary focus on health and disease prevention and nutrition information literacy. Prerequisite: BIO102 and CHE102. 3 credits.

BIO324 Pathophysiology

This course studies the physiological changes that occur in the body as a result of disease processes.  An understanding of the normal structure and function of the human body is required as disease development can only be understood from that context.  In addition, because some disease processes are studied at the level of the cell and tissues, some aspects of Pathology are included.  Specific topics covered will include fluid, electrolyte and acid-base imbalances; pharmacology and common therapies; pain; inflammation; healing; infection; immunity; disorders of the skin, musculoskeletal system, blood and circulatory system, lymphatic system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, nervous system, sensory organs, endocrine system, digestive system, urinary system and reproductive system; neoplasms and cancer; congenital and genetic disorders; pregnancy and adolescence; aging; immobility; stress; substance abuse; and environmental hazards. Prerequisite: BIO102, BIO241, BIO322. 4 credits.

BIO331 Exercise Physiology

This course studies the physiological changes that occur in the body as a result of exercise.  Of particular interest are the long-term effects of exercise programs with respect to cardiorespiratory fitness, health-related physical fitness and sport performance.  Specific topics covered will include bioenergetics; exercise metabolism; exercise and the immune, nervous, skeletal muscle, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; exercise and acid-base and temperature regulation; physiology of training; inflammation and chronic disease; evaluation of cardiorespiratory fitness; exercise prescriptions for health and fitness; exercise for special populations; body composition and nutrition for health; training for performance; body composition and nutrition for performance; exercise and environment; and ergogenic aids.  Prerequisite: BIO102 and BIO322. 3 credits.

BIO341 Cell Biology

This course is a survey of topics covering the structure, metabolism and genetics of eukaryotic cells, with some coverage of prokaryotic cells.  Topics covered will include organelles, metabolic pathways, enzymes, cell communication, cell reproduction, gene expression and cancer. Lab coat required. Prerequisite: BIO102. $125 lab fee. 4 credits.

BIO410 Advanced Physiology

This is a one semester advanced course on the principles of human physiology.  Specifically, the principles of cell processes, homeostasis and control, integration of function, and metabolism, growth and aging will be discussed. The major focus of this course is problem-solving skills. This course is suitable for Health Science majors.  Prerequisite: BIO102. 3 credits.

BIO412 Immunology

This course is focused on the immune system, an integrated network of cells, molecules and organs.  The immune system will be studied both in big picture concepts and in cellular and molecular details.  The sequence of topics covered will reflect the sequence of events that occurs normally during typical immune responses.  Specific topics covered will include cells, organs and environments of the immune system; receptors and signaling; innate immunity; the complement system; expression of lymphocyte receptor genes; the major histocompatibility complex and antigen presentation; T-cell and B-cell development, activation, differentiation and memory; cell- and antibody-mediated immunity; the immune response; allergy, hypersensitivities, and chronic inflammation; tolerance, autoimmunity and transplantation; infectious diseases and vaccines; immunodeficiency disorders; cancer and immunity; and experimental systems and methods. Prerequisite: BIO102, BIO241, BIO251.  3 credits.

BIO420 Medical Microbiology

This is an advanced course in microbiology that focuses on infectious agents that cause diseases, the mechanisms by which they cause disease, risk factors for infection and treatments.  The immune system will be discussed throughout the topics covered which will include laboratory diagnosis, bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology. Emphasis will be placed on clinical application. Prerequisite: BIO251. 3 credits.

BIO422 Neuroscience

This course represents a starting point for understanding the operation of the human brain and nervous system based on structure and function relationships and neurological and psychiatric disease.  An in-depth study of neuroanatomy will help students understand the organization of the nervous system.  Students will also explore the development and function of the nervous system.  Specific areas of focus will include anatomical, electorphysiological, cellular and molecular functions of neurons and glia.  Also included are sensory and motor systems and the associational systems that link them to produce higher order brain functions.  Lab coat required. Prerequisite: BIO322. $125 lab fee. 4 credits.

BIO430 Health Science Seminar

This is a capstone course for Health Science majors. The overall objective of this course is to provide a mechanism for students to synthesize knowledge gained through coursework into a comprehensive paper and presentation of their own creation. Students will work with the course instructor to develop a thesis topic that is centered in health professions that will function as the basis for the paper and presentation. Students will present their paper both in class and on Capstone Wednesday. Senior standing. 3 credits.

CHE101 General Chemistry I

This is the first of a two-part course on the principles of chemistry.  Specifically, the principles of matter, atoms, elements, molecules, compounds, chemical equations, laws of mass action, aqueous reactions, gases, thermochemistry, atomic quantum mechanics, periodic properties of elements and chemical bonding theories will be discussed.  A major focus of the course is problem-solving skills.  Also, science as a way of knowing is emphasized.  This course is suitable for health science majors and counts toward the natural science component of the College Core Curriculum.  Lab coat required.  $125 lab fee. 4 credits.

CHE102 General Chemistry II

This is the second of a two-part course on the principles of chemistry.  Specifically, the principles of liquids, solids, intermolecular forces, solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, aqueous ionic equilibrium, free energy, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, radioactivity and nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry will be discussed.  A major focus of this course is problem-solving skills.  Also, science as a way of knowing is emphasized.  This course is suitable for Health Science majors.  Lab coat required.  Prerequisite: CHE101. $125 lab fee. 4 credits.

CHE421 Biochemistry

This is a one semester course on the principles of biochemistry.  Specifically, the principles of water, structure and function of biologically important molecules, metabolism, bioenergetics and biological information flow will be discussed.  A major focus of this course is problem-solving skills and experimental design.  Also, science as way of knowing and direct application of the scientific method is emphasized.  This course is suitable for Health Science majors.  Lab coat required.  Prerequisite:  BIO241 and CHE102. 5 credits.

PHY241 College Physics I

This is the first of a two-part course on the principles of physics.  Specifically, the principles of mechanics, oscillations, waves, and fluids, and thermodynamics will be discussed.  A major focus of this course is problem-solving skills and experimental design.  Also, science as a way of knowing and direct application of the scientific method is emphasized.  This course is suitable for Health Science majors.  Lab coat required.  Prerequisite:  MAT204. 4 credits.

PHY242 College Physics II

This is the second of a two-part course on the principles of physics.  Specifically, the principles of electromagnetism, optics and modern physics will be discussed.  A major focus of this course is problem-solving skills and experimental design.  Also, science as a way of knowing and direct application of the scientific method is emphasized.  This course is suitable for Health Science majors.  Lab coat required.  Prerequisite:  MAT204 and PHY241. 4 credits.